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Physicochemical analysis of initial adhesion and biofilm formation of Methanosarcina barkeri on polymer support material

Overview of attention for article published in Colloids & Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, July 2016
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2 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Physicochemical analysis of initial adhesion and biofilm formation of Methanosarcina barkeri on polymer support material
Published in
Colloids & Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, July 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2016.03.042
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vi Nguyen, Esther Karunakaran, Gavin Collins, Catherine A. Biggs

Abstract

The retention of selective biofilms of Methanosarcina species within anaerobic digesters could reduce start-up times and enhance the efficiency of the process in treating high-strength domestic sewage. The objective of the study was to examine the effect of the surface characteristics of six common polymer support materials on the initial adhesion of the model methanogen, Methanosarcina barkeri, and to assess the potential of these support materials as selective biofilm carriers. Results from both the initial adhesion tests and extended DLVO (xDLVO) model correlated with each other, with PVC (12% surface coverage/mm(2)), PTFE (6% surface coverage/mm(2)), and PP (6% surface coverage/mm(2)), shown to be the better performing support materials for initial adhesion, as well as subsequent biofilm formation by M. barkeri after 72h. Experimental results of these three support materials showed that the type of material strongly influenced the extent of adhesion from M. barkeri (p<0.0001), and the xDLVO model was able to explain the results in these environmental conditions. Therefore, DLVO physicochemical forces were found to be influential on the initial adhesion of M. barkeri. Scanning electron microscopy suggested that production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from M. barkeri could facilitate further biofilm development. This study highlights the potential of using the xDLVO model to rapidly identify suitable materials for the selective adhesion of M. barkeri, which could be beneficial in both the start-up and long-term phases of anaerobic digestion.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 40 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 17%
Researcher 6 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 17%
Environmental Science 7 17%
Engineering 6 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 9 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2016.
All research outputs
#9,808,214
of 12,278,153 outputs
Outputs from Colloids & Surfaces B: Biointerfaces
#1,016
of 1,599 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#196,751
of 279,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Colloids & Surfaces B: Biointerfaces
#21
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,278,153 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,599 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,567 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.