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Trends in popularity of some morphological traits of purebred dogs in Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, April 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

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27 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
10 tweeters
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4 Facebook pages

Citations

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17 Dimensions

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Trends in popularity of some morphological traits of purebred dogs in Australia
Published in
Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40575-016-0032-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kendy T. Teng, Paul D. McGreevy, Jenny-Ann L. M. L. Toribio, Navneet K. Dhand

Abstract

The morphology of dogs can provide information about their predisposition to some disorders. For example, larger breeds are predisposed to hip dysplasia and many neoplastic diseases. Therefore, longitudinal trends in popularity of dog morphology can reveal potential disease pervasiveness in the future. There have been reports on the popularity of particular breeds and behavioural traits but trends in the morphological traits of preferred breeds have not been studied. This study investigated trends in the height, dog size and head shape (cephalic index) of Australian purebred dogs. One hundred eighty-one breeds derived from Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC) registration statistics from 1986 to 2013 were analysed. Weighted regression analyses were conducted to examine trends in the traits by using them as outcome variables, with year as the explanatory variable and numbers of registered dogs as weights. Linear regression investigated dog height and cephalic index (skull width/skull length), and multinomial logistic regression studied dog size. The total number of ANKC registration had decreased gradually from 95,792 in 1986 to 66,902 in 2013. Both weighted minimal height (p = 0.014) and weighted maximal height (p < 0.001) decreased significantly over time, and the weighted cephalic index increased significantly (p < 0.001). The odds of registration of medium and small breeds increased by 5.3 % and 4.2 %, respectively, relative to large breeds (p < 0.001) and by 12.1 % and 11.0 %, respectively, relative to giant breeds (p < 0.001) for each 5-year block of time. Compared to taller and larger breeds, shorter and smaller breeds have become relatively popular over time. Mean cephalic index has increased, which indicates that Australians have gradually favoured breeds with shorter and wider heads (brachycephalic). These significant trends indicate that the dog morphological traits reported here may potentially influence how people select companion dogs in Australia and provide valuable predictive information on the pervasiveness of diseases in dogs.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 1 3%
Unknown 39 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 33%
Researcher 8 20%
Student > Master 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Professor 2 5%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 13 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Psychology 3 8%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 256. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 February 2020.
All research outputs
#64,032
of 15,628,316 outputs
Outputs from Canine Genetics and Epidemiology
#3
of 74 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,025
of 266,294 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canine Genetics and Epidemiology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,628,316 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 74 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,294 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them