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Calcium Signaling in Oomycetes: An Evolutionary Perspective

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Physiology, April 2016
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Title
Calcium Signaling in Oomycetes: An Evolutionary Perspective
Published in
Frontiers in Physiology, April 2016
DOI 10.3389/fphys.2016.00123
Pubmed ID
Authors

Limian Zheng, John J. Mackrill

Abstract

Oomycetes are a family of eukaryotic microbes that superficially resemble fungi, but which are phylogenetically distinct from them. These organisms cause major global economic losses to agriculture and fisheries, with representative pathogens being Phytophthora infestans, the cause of late potato blight and Saprolegnia diclina, the instigator of "cotton molds" in fish. As in all eukaryotes, cytoplasmic Ca(2+) is a key second messenger in oomycetes, regulating life-cycle transitions, controlling motility and chemotaxis and, in excess, leading to cell-death. Despite this, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentrations in these organisms. Consequently, this review analyzed the presence of candidate calcium channels encoded within the nine oomycete genomes that are currently available. This revealed key differences between oomycetes and other eukaryotes, in particular the expansion and loss of different channel families, and the presence of a phylum-specific group of proteins, termed the polycystic kidney disease tandem ryanodine receptor domain (PKDRR) channels.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 21%
Researcher 7 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 21%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 8 21%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2016.
All research outputs
#18,450,346
of 22,860,626 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Physiology
#8,155
of 13,646 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,384
of 300,859 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Physiology
#86
of 126 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,860,626 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,646 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,859 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 126 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.