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Presence of three dengue serotypes in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso): research and public health implications

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
120 Mendeley
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Title
Presence of three dengue serotypes in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso): research and public health implications
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40249-016-0120-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Valéry Ridde, Isabelle Agier, Emmanuel Bonnet, Mabel Carabali, Kounbobr Roch Dabiré, Florence Fournet, Antarou Ly, Ivlabèhiré Bertrand Meda, Beatriz Parra

Abstract

The significant malaria burden in Africa has often eclipsed other febrile illnesses. Burkina Faso's first dengue epidemic occurred in 1925 and the most recent in 2013. Yet there is still very little known about dengue prevalence, its vector proliferation, and its poverty and equity impacts. An exploratory cross-sectional survey was performed from December 2013 to January 2014. Six primary healthcare centers in Ouagadougou were selected based on previously reported presence of Flavivirus. All patients consulting with fever or having had fever within the previous week and with a negative rapid diagnostic test (RDT) for malaria were invited to participate. Sociodemographic data, healthcare use and expenses, mobility, health-related status, and vector control practices were captured using a questionnaire. Blood samples of every eligible subject were obtained through finger pricks during the survey for dengue RDT using SD BIOLINE Dengue Duo (NS1Ag and IgG/IgM)® and to obtain blood spots for reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. In a sample of randomly selected yards and those of patients, potential Aedes breeding sites were found and described. Larvae were collected and brought to the laboratory to monitor the emergence of adults and identify the species. Of the 379 subjects, 8.7 % (33/379) had positive RDTs for dengue. Following the 2009 WHO classification, 38.3 % (145/379) had presumptive, probable, or confirmed dengue, based on either clinical symptoms or laboratory testing. Of 60 samples tested by RT-PCR (33 from the positive tests and 27 from the subsample of negatives), 15 were positive. The serotypes observed were DENV2, DENV3, and DENV4. Odds of dengue infection in 15-to-20-year-olds and persons over 50 years were 4.0 (CI 95 %: 1.0-15.6) and 7.7 (CI 95 %: 1.6-37.1) times higher, respectively, than in children under five. Average total spending for a dengue episode was 13 771 FCFA [1 300-67 300 FCFA] (1$US = 478 FCFA). On average, 2.6 breeding sites were found per yard. Potential Aedes breeding sites were found near 71.4 % (21/28) of patients, but no adult Aedes were found. The most frequently identified potential breeding sites were water storage containers (45.2 %). Most specimens collected in yards were Culex (97.9 %). The scientific community, public health authorities, and health workers should consider dengue as a possible cause of febrile illness in Burkina Faso.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Unknown 118 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 41 34%
Researcher 23 19%
Student > Bachelor 10 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 8%
Student > Postgraduate 8 7%
Other 15 13%
Unknown 13 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 9%
Social Sciences 11 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 8%
Other 24 20%
Unknown 16 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 December 2016.
All research outputs
#2,647,503
of 14,227,218 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#101
of 516 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,849
of 263,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,227,218 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 516 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,771 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.