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Death and the Oldest Old: Attitudes and Preferences for End-of-Life Care - Qualitative Research within a Population-Based Cohort Study

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
28 news outlets
twitter
144 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
6 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
98 Mendeley
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Title
Death and the Oldest Old: Attitudes and Preferences for End-of-Life Care - Qualitative Research within a Population-Based Cohort Study
Published in
PLoS ONE, April 2016
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0150686
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jane Fleming, Morag Farquhar, Carol Brayne, Stephen Barclay

Abstract

Increasing longevity means more people will be dying in very old age, but little is known about the preferences of the 'oldest old' regarding their care at the end of life. To understand very old people's preferences regarding care towards the end of life and attitudes towards dying, to inform policy and practice. Qualitative data collection for n = 42 population-based cohort study participants aged 95-101 (88% women, 42% in long-term-care): topic-guided interviews with n = 33 participants and n = 39 proxy informants, most with both (n = 30: 4 jointly + separate interviews for 26 dyads). Death was a part of life: these very old people mainly live day-to-day. Most were ready to die, reflecting their concerns regarding quality of life, being a nuisance, having nothing to live for and having lived long enough. Contrasting views were rare exceptions but voiced firmly. Most were not worried about death itself, but concerned more about the dying process and impacts on those left behind; a peaceful and pain-free death was a common ideal. Attitudes ranged from not wanting to think about death, through accepting its inevitable approach to longing for its release. Preferring to be made comfortable rather than have life-saving treatment if seriously ill, and wishing to avoid hospital, were commonly expressed views. There was little or no future planning, some consciously choosing not to. Uncertainty hampered end-of-life planning even when death was expected soon. Some stressed circumstances, such as severe dependency and others' likely decision-making roles, would influence choices. Carers found these issues harder to raise but felt they would know their older relatives' preferences, usually palliative care, although we found two discrepant views. This study's rare data show ≥95-year-olds are willing to discuss dying and end-of-life care but seldom do. Formal documentation of wishes is extremely rare and may not be welcome. Although being "ready to die" and preferring a palliative approach predominated, these preferences cannot be assumed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 144 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 95 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 20 20%
Student > Master 15 15%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Other 9 9%
Other 31 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 30%
Unspecified 22 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 19%
Social Sciences 9 9%
Psychology 8 8%
Other 11 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 311. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2018.
All research outputs
#38,325
of 13,615,090 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#836
of 144,365 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,509
of 261,805 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#49
of 5,344 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,615,090 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 144,365 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,805 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,344 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.