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Barriers and facilitators to staying in work after stroke: insight from an online forum

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
43 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
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Title
Barriers and facilitators to staying in work after stroke: insight from an online forum
Published in
BMJ Open, April 2016
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009974
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chantal Balasooriya-Smeekens, Andrew Bateman, Jonathan Mant, Anna De Simoni

Abstract

To explore barriers and facilitators to staying in work following stroke. Qualitative analysis of posts regarding staying in work following stroke using the archives of an online forum for stroke survivors. 60 stroke survivors (29 male, 23 female, 8 not stated; mean age at stroke 44 years) who have returned to work, identified using terms 'return to work' and 'back at work'. Posts from UK stroke survivors and family members on Talkstroke, the forum of the Stroke Association, between 2004 and 2011. Stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA) survivors reported residual impairments that for many had impact on work. Most impairments were 'invisible', including fatigue, problems with concentration, memory and personality changes. Participants described positive (eg, back at work being better than expected) and negative work experiences, including being at risk of losing the job because of stroke-related impairments. Barriers to successfully staying in work included lack of understanding of stroke-in particular invisible impairments-of survivors, employers and general practitioners (GPs), and lack of support in terms of formal adjustments, and 'feeling supported'. Stroke survivors described how they developed their own coping strategies, and how workplace and employer helped them to stay in work. Despite having been able to return to work after a stroke, people may still experience difficulties in staying in work and risking losing their job. There is a need to improve awareness, in particular of invisible stroke-related impairments, among stroke survivors, work personnel and clinicians. This might be achieved through improved assessments of residual impairments in the workplace and in general practice. Future studies should investigate the effect of unrecognised fatigue and invisible impairments on staying in work following stroke, and explore the potential role for primary care in supporting stroke survivors who have returned to employment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 43 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 73 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 23%
Student > Bachelor 11 15%
Unspecified 9 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Other 23 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 28%
Unspecified 14 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 19%
Psychology 10 14%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Other 10 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 72. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 November 2019.
All research outputs
#245,937
of 13,871,708 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#510
of 12,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,471
of 262,790 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#16
of 371 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,871,708 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,526 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,790 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 371 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.