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Bicycle helmet legislation for the uptake of helmet use and prevention of head injuries

Overview of attention for article published in this source, July 2008
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Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
30 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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97 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
162 Mendeley
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Title
Bicycle helmet legislation for the uptake of helmet use and prevention of head injuries
Published by
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, July 2008
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd005401.pub3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alison Macpherson, Anneliese Spinks, Macpherson A, Spinks A, Macpherson, Alison, Spinks, Anneliese

Abstract

Evidence exists to suggest that bicycle helmets may reduce the risk of head injuries to cyclists, however helmets are not uniformly worn by all bicycle users. Legislation has been enacted in some countries to mandate helmet use by cyclists, however the issue remains controversial with opponents arguing that this may inhibit people from bicycle riding and thus from gaining the associated health benefits, or that other countermeasures may have been responsible for decline in head injuries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 30 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 162 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 6 4%
United States 3 2%
Netherlands 2 1%
Australia 1 <1%
Kazakhstan 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 144 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 32 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 18%
Researcher 29 18%
Other 15 9%
Student > Bachelor 14 9%
Other 43 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 63 39%
Social Sciences 20 12%
Unspecified 16 10%
Engineering 12 7%
Psychology 10 6%
Other 41 25%