↓ Skip to main content

Restoring cortical control of functional movement in a human with quadriplegia

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, April 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

dimensions_citation
219 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
717 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Restoring cortical control of functional movement in a human with quadriplegia
Published in
Nature, April 2016
DOI 10.1038/nature17435
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chad E. Bouton, Ammar Shaikhouni, Nicholas V. Annetta, Marcia A. Bockbrader, David A. Friedenberg, Dylan M. Nielson, Gaurav Sharma, Per B. Sederberg, Bradley C. Glenn, W. Jerry Mysiw, Austin G. Morgan, Milind Deogaonkar, Ali R. Rezai

Abstract

Millions of people worldwide suffer from diseases that lead to paralysis through disruption of signal pathways between the brain and the muscles. Neuroprosthetic devices are designed to restore lost function and could be used to form an electronic 'neural bypass' to circumvent disconnected pathways in the nervous system. It has previously been shown that intracortically recorded signals can be decoded to extract information related to motion, allowing non-human primates and paralysed humans to control computers and robotic arms through imagined movements. In non-human primates, these types of signal have also been used to drive activation of chemically paralysed arm muscles. Here we show that intracortically recorded signals can be linked in real-time to muscle activation to restore movement in a paralysed human. We used a chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode array to record multiunit activity from the motor cortex in a study participant with quadriplegia from cervical spinal cord injury. We applied machine-learning algorithms to decode the neuronal activity and control activation of the participant's forearm muscles through a custom-built high-resolution neuromuscular electrical stimulation system. The system provided isolated finger movements and the participant achieved continuous cortical control of six different wrist and hand motions. Furthermore, he was able to use the system to complete functional tasks relevant to daily living. Clinical assessment showed that, when using the system, his motor impairment improved from the fifth to the sixth cervical (C5-C6) to the seventh cervical to first thoracic (C7-T1) level unilaterally, conferring on him the critical abilities to grasp, manipulate, and release objects. This is the first demonstration to our knowledge of successful control of muscle activation using intracortically recorded signals in a paralysed human. These results have significant implications in advancing neuroprosthetic technology for people worldwide living with the effects of paralysis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 368 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 717 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 21 3%
United Kingdom 7 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Singapore 2 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Other 7 <1%
Unknown 670 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 203 28%
Researcher 142 20%
Student > Master 79 11%
Student > Bachelor 70 10%
Unspecified 48 7%
Other 175 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 185 26%
Neuroscience 133 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 86 12%
Unspecified 85 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 80 11%
Other 148 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2427. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 May 2019.
All research outputs
#439
of 13,118,748 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#81
of 68,705 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17
of 264,683 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#4
of 1,002 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,118,748 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 68,705 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 74.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,683 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,002 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.