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Comparative analysis of copy number variations in ulcerative colitis associated and sporadic colorectal neoplasia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, April 2016
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Title
Comparative analysis of copy number variations in ulcerative colitis associated and sporadic colorectal neoplasia
Published in
BMC Cancer, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2303-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

B. M. Shivakumar, Sanjiban Chakrabarty, Harish Rotti, Venu Seenappa, Lakshmi Rao, Vasudevan Geetha, B. V. Tantry, Hema Kini, Rajesh Dharamsi, C. Ganesh Pai, Kapaettu Satyamoorthy

Abstract

The incidence of and mortality from colorectal cancers (CRC) can be reduced by early detection. Currently there is a lack of established markers to detect early neoplastic changes. We aimed to identify the copy number variations (CNVs) and the associated genes which could be potential markers for the detection of neoplasia in both ulcerative colitis-associated neoplasia (UC-CRN) and sporadic colorectal neoplasia (S-CRN). We employed array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) to identify CNVs in tissue samples of UC nonprogressor, progressor and sporadic CRC. Select genes within these CNV regions as a panel of markers were validated using quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) method along with the microsatellite instability (MSI) in an independent cohort of samples. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis was also performed. Integrated analysis showed 10 overlapping CNV regions between UC-Progressor and S-CRN, with the 8q and 12p regions showing greater overlap. The qRT-PCR based panel of MYC, MYCN, CCND1, CCND2, EGFR and FNDC3A was successful in detecting neoplasia with an overall accuracy of 54 % in S-CRN compared to that of 29 % in UC neoplastic samples. IHC study showed that p53 and CCND1 were significantly overexpressed with an increasing frequency from pre-neoplastic to neoplastic stages. EGFR and AMACR were expressed only in the neoplastic conditions. CNVs that are common and unique to both UC-associated and sporadic colorectal neoplasm could be the key players driving carcinogenesis. Comparative analysis of CNVs provides testable driver aberrations but needs further evaluation in larger cohorts of samples. These markers may help in developing more effective neoplasia-detection strategies during screening and surveillance programs.

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Mendeley readers

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The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 2%
Unknown 64 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 20%
Student > Master 7 11%
Other 6 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Other 14 22%
Unknown 15 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 11%
Unspecified 4 6%
Computer Science 2 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 17 26%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 April 2016.
All research outputs
#19,054,237
of 23,613,071 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#5,567
of 8,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,142
of 302,025 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#84
of 133 outputs
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