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Research methods of Talking About The Smokes: an International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project study with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians

Overview of attention for article published in Medical Journal of Australia, June 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
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Title
Research methods of Talking About The Smokes: an International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project study with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians
Published in
Medical Journal of Australia, June 2015
DOI 10.5694/mja14.00874
Pubmed ID
Authors

David P Thomas, Viki L Briggs, Sophia Couzos, Maureen E Davey, Jennifer M Hunt, Kathryn S Panaretto, Anke E van der Sterren, Matthew Stevens, Anna K Nicholson, Ron Borland, Thomas, David P, Briggs, Viki L, Couzos, Sophia, Davey, Maureen E, Hunt, Jennifer M, Panaretto, Kathryn S, van der Sterren, Anke E, Stevens, Matthew, Nicholson, Anna K, Borland, Ron

Abstract

To describe the research methods and baseline sample of the Talking About The Smokes (TATS) project. The TATS project is a collaboration between research institutions and Aboriginal community-controlled health services (ACCHSs) and their state and national representative bodies. It is one of the studies within the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project, enabling national and international comparisons. It includes a prospective longitudinal study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers and recent ex-smokers; a survey of non-smokers; repeated cross-sectional surveys of ACCHS staff; and descriptions of the tobacco policies and practices at the ACCHSs. Community members completed face-to-face surveys; staff completed surveys on paper or online. We compared potential biases and the distribution of variables common to the main community baseline sample and unweighted and weighted results of the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey (NATSISS). The baseline survey (Wave 1) was conducted between April 2012 and October 2013. 2522 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in 35 locations (the communities served by 34 ACCHSs and one community in the Torres Strait), and 645 staff in the ACCHSs. Sociodemographic and general health indicators, smoking status, number of cigarettes smoked per day and quit attempts. The main community baseline sample closely matched the distribution of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in the weighted NATSISS by age, sex, jurisdiction and remoteness. There were inconsistent differences in some sociodemographic factors between our sample and the NATSISS: our sample had higher proportions of unemployed people, but also higher proportions who had completed Year 12 and who lived in more advantaged areas. In both surveys, similar percentages of smokers reported having attempted to quit in the past year, and daily smokers reported similar numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. The TATS project provides a detailed and nationally representative description of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smoking behaviour, attitudes, knowledge and exposure to tobacco control activities and policies, and their association with quitting.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 8%
Unknown 12 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 23%
Researcher 3 23%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Student > Master 1 8%
Other 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 3 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 15%
Psychology 2 15%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 8%
Other 2 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 July 2011.
All research outputs
#1,914,348
of 7,813,034 outputs
Outputs from Medical Journal of Australia
#561
of 1,454 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,610
of 270,758 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Medical Journal of Australia
#42
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,813,034 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 61st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,454 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.7. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,758 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.