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Studies on the relationship between pulsed UV light irradiation and the simultaneous occurrence of molecular and cellular damage in clinically-relevant Candida albicans

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Microbiological Methods, February 2011
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Title
Studies on the relationship between pulsed UV light irradiation and the simultaneous occurrence of molecular and cellular damage in clinically-relevant Candida albicans
Published in
Journal of Microbiological Methods, February 2011
DOI 10.1016/j.mimet.2010.12.021
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hugh Farrell, Jennifer Hayes, John Laffey, Neil Rowan

Abstract

This constitutes the first study to report on the relationship between pulsed UV light (PL) irradiation and the simultaneous occurrence of molecular and cellular damage in clinical strains of Candida albicans. Microbial protein leakage and propidium iodide (PI) uptake assays demonstrated significant increases in cell membrane permeability in PL-treated yeast that depended on the amount of UV pulses applied. This finding correlated well with the measurement of increased levels of lipid hydroperoxidation in the cell membrane of PL-treated yeast. PL-treated yeast cells also displayed a specific pattern of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, where ROS were initially localised in the mitochondria after low levels of pulsing (UV dose 0.82 μJ/cm(2)) before more wide-spread cytosolic ROS production occurred with enhanced pulsing. Intracellular ROS levels were measured using the specific mitochondrial peroxide stain dihydrorhodamine 123 and the cytosolic oxidation stain dichloroflurescin diacetate. Use of the dihydroethidium stain also revealed increased levels of intracellular superoxide as a consequence of augmented pulsing. The ROS bursts observed during the initial phases of PL treatment was consistent with the occurrence of apoptotic cells as confirmed by detection of specific apoptotic markers, abnormal chromatin condensation and externalisation of cell membrane lipid phosphatidylserine. Increased amount of PL-irradiation (ca. UV does 1.24-1.65 μJ/cm(2)) also resulted in the occurrence of late apoptotic and necrotic yeast phenotypes, which coincided with the transition from mitochondrial to cytosolic localisation of ROS and with irreversible cell membrane leakage. Use of the comet assay also revealed significant nuclear damage in similarly treated PL samples. Although some level of cellular repair was observed in all test strains during sub-lethal exposure to PL-treatments (≤20 pulses or UV dose 0.55 μJ/cm(2)), this was absent in similar samples exposed to increased amounts of pulsing. This study showed that PL-irradiation inactivates C. albicans test strains through a multi-targeted process with no evidence of microbial ability to support cell growth after ≤20 pulses. Implications of our findings in terms of application of PL for contact-surface disinfection are discussed.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
China 1 2%
Unknown 39 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 29%
Student > Master 10 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Professor 1 2%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 5 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 37%
Engineering 6 15%
Environmental Science 3 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 5 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2012.
All research outputs
#10,864,062
of 12,258,221 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Microbiological Methods
#1,375
of 1,670 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,938
of 114,321 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Microbiological Methods
#19
of 21 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,670 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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