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Dinosaurs in decline tens of millions of years before their final extinction

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#43 of 79,429)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
227 news outlets
blogs
20 blogs
twitter
169 tweeters
facebook
17 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
6 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
187 Mendeley
Title
Dinosaurs in decline tens of millions of years before their final extinction
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2016
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1521478113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Manabu Sakamoto, Michael J. Benton, Chris Venditti

Abstract

Whether dinosaurs were in a long-term decline or whether they were reigning strong right up to their final disappearance at the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass extinction event 66 Mya has been debated for decades with no clear resolution. The dispute has continued unresolved because of a lack of statistical rigor and appropriate evolutionary framework. Here, for the first time to our knowledge, we apply a Bayesian phylogenetic approach to model the evolutionary dynamics of speciation and extinction through time in Mesozoic dinosaurs, properly taking account of previously ignored statistical violations. We find overwhelming support for a long-term decline across all dinosaurs and within all three dinosaurian subclades (Ornithischia, Sauropodomorpha, and Theropoda), where speciation rate slowed down through time and was ultimately exceeded by extinction rate tens of millions of years before the K-Pg boundary. The only exceptions to this general pattern are the morphologically specialized herbivores, the Hadrosauriformes and Ceratopsidae, which show rapid species proliferations throughout the Late Cretaceous instead. Our results highlight that, despite some heterogeneity in speciation dynamics, dinosaurs showed a marked reduction in their ability to replace extinct species with new ones, making them vulnerable to extinction and unable to respond quickly to and recover from the final catastrophic event.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 169 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 187 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 2%
Brazil 3 2%
Germany 2 1%
France 2 1%
Canada 2 1%
Austria 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 6 3%
Unknown 165 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 50 27%
Student > Bachelor 30 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 16%
Student > Master 20 11%
Other 14 7%
Other 44 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 68 36%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 57 30%
Unspecified 22 12%
Environmental Science 11 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 5%
Other 19 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2043. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2019.
All research outputs
#696
of 13,107,259 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#43
of 79,429 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32
of 263,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#5
of 897 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,107,259 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,429 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,602 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 897 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.