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Women and their birth partners’ experiences following a primary postpartum haemorrhage: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, April 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

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22 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Women and their birth partners’ experiences following a primary postpartum haemorrhage: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-0870-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. Dunning, J. M. Harris, J. Sandall

Abstract

Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a common obstetric complication. Rates of PPH are increasing in a number of developed countries. This is concerning as PPH is recognised as a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality which includes psychological and emotional distress. There is limited understanding of the emotional impact of PPH experienced by women and their birth partners. This study qualitatively describes the experiences of women and their birth partners who experienced a primary PPH. Semi-structured interview study. Couples were recruited via maximum variation sampling, which, by purposive sampling drew participants from three groups depending on the degree of PPH: minor (500-1000 ml), moderate (1000-2000 ml) and severe (>2000 ml). Interviews took place from 4 to 14 months post birth, and data were analysed via Framework analysis. In this qualitative study, 11 women and six partners were interviewed. Data were organised into four interrelated themes; Control, Communication, Consequence, Competence. Just over half of the women and their birth partners were unaware they had a PPH, and would have preferred more information either at the time or in the postnatal period. The findings suggest that birth partners also required more information, especially if separated from their partner during the PPH. This study provides valuable insights into women's reports of their feelings and experiences during and after a PPH, and how their partners feel having observed a PPH. This study suggests that women who have had a PPH of any volume would like more information. Further investigations into the timings, methods and effectiveness of discussions following a PPH are recommended.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 41 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 10 24%
Student > Master 10 24%
Student > Bachelor 9 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 12%
Researcher 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 33%
Unspecified 11 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 21%
Psychology 6 14%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2016.
All research outputs
#991,860
of 13,593,005 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#257
of 2,476 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,509
of 261,802 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,593,005 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,476 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,802 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them