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Adolescents' and Young Adults' Beliefs about Mental Health Services and Care: A Systematic Review

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, October 2016
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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172 Mendeley
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Title
Adolescents' and Young Adults' Beliefs about Mental Health Services and Care: A Systematic Review
Published in
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, October 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.apnu.2016.04.004
Pubmed ID
Authors

John Goodwin, Eileen Savage, Aine Horgan

Abstract

Adolescents and young people are known to hold negative views about mental illness. There is less known about their beliefs about mental health services and care. The aim of this study was to systematically examine literature on the beliefs of adolescents and young people from the general population about mental health services and care. Factors that positively and negatively influence these beliefs are also explored. Relevant electronic databases were searched for papers published in the English language between January 2004 and October 2015. Culture seemed to influence how adolescents and young adults perceived mental health interventions. This was particularly evident in countries such as Palestine and South Africa where prayer was highly valued. Adolescents and young people were uninformed about psychiatric medication. They believed that accessing mental health care was a sign of weakness. Furthermore, they viewed psychiatric hospitals and various mental health professionals negatively. Film was found to have a negative impact on how adolescents and young people perceived mental health services, whereas open communication with family members was found to have a positive impact. Adolescents and young adults hold uninformed and stigmatizing beliefs about mental health treatments, mental health professionals, and access to care. The sources of these beliefs remain unclear although some at least seem influenced by culture. Further research, (particularly qualitative research) in this area is recommended in order to address current gaps in knowledge.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 172 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Singapore 1 <1%
Unknown 170 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 20%
Student > Bachelor 26 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 12%
Researcher 17 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 9%
Other 25 15%
Unknown 33 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 52 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 30 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 13%
Social Sciences 14 8%
Linguistics 2 1%
Other 12 7%
Unknown 40 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2016.
All research outputs
#12,838,396
of 14,533,317 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Psychiatric Nursing
#423
of 718 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,156
of 263,361 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Psychiatric Nursing
#26
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,533,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 718 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,361 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.