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Methylmercury Bioaccumulation in Stream Food Webs Declines with Increasing Primary Production

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, June 2015
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Title
Methylmercury Bioaccumulation in Stream Food Webs Declines with Increasing Primary Production
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, June 2015
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.5b00911
Pubmed ID
Authors

David M. Walters, David F. Raikow, Chad R. Hammerschmidt, Molly G. Mehling, Amanda Kovach, James T. Oris

Abstract

Opposing hypotheses posit that increasing primary productivity should result in either greater or lesser contaminant accumulation in stream food webs. We conducted an experiment to evaluate primary productivity effects on MeHg accumulation in stream consumers. We varied light for sixteen artificial streams creating a productivity gradient (oxygen production = 0.048 - 0.71 mg O2 L-1 d-1) among streams. Two-level food webs were established consisting of phytoplankton/filter feeding clam, periphyton/grazing snail, and leaves/shredding amphipod (Hyalella azteca). Phytoplankton and periphyton biomass, along with MeHg removal from the water column, increased significantly with productivity, but MeHg concentrations in these primary producers declined. Methylmercury in clams and snails also declined with productivity, and consumer concentrations were strongly correlated with MeHg concentrations in primary producers. Heterotroph biomass on leaves, MeHg in leaves, and MeHg in Hyalella were unrelated to stream productivity. Our results support the hypothesis that contaminant bioaccumulation declines with stream primary production via the mechanism of bloom dilution (MeHg burden per cell decreases in algal blooms), extending patterns of contaminant accumulation documented in lakes to lotic systems.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 5%
Canada 2 3%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 54 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 25%
Student > Master 13 22%
Student > Bachelor 7 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Professor 5 8%
Other 12 20%
Unknown 3 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 25 42%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 7%
Chemistry 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 10 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2016.
All research outputs
#9,833,814
of 12,313,065 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#11,029
of 12,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,813
of 275,991 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#182
of 217 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,313,065 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,334 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,991 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 217 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.