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Detecting the movement and spawning activity of bigheaded carps with environmental DNA

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology Resources, May 2016
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Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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61 Dimensions

Readers on

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157 Mendeley
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Title
Detecting the movement and spawning activity of bigheaded carps with environmental DNA
Published in
Molecular Ecology Resources, May 2016
DOI 10.1111/1755-0998.12533
Pubmed ID
Authors

Richard A. Erickson, Christopher B. Rees, Alison A. Coulter, Christopher M. Merkes, Sunnie G. McCalla, Katherine F. Touzinsky, Liza Walleser, Reuben R. Goforth, Jon J. Amberg

Abstract

Bigheaded carps are invasive fishes threatening to invade the Great Lakes basin and establish spawning populations, and have been monitored using environmental DNA (eDNA). Not only does eDNA hold potential for detecting the presence of species, but may also allow for quantitative comparisons like relative abundance of species across time or space. We examined the relationships among bigheaded carp movement, hydrography, spawning, and eDNA on the Wabash River, IN, USA. We found positive relationships between eDNA and movement and eDNA and hydrography. We did not find a relationship between eDNA and spawning activity in the form of drifting eggs. Our first finding demonstrates how eDNA may be used to monitor species abundance, whereas our second finding illustrates the need for additional research into eDNA methodologies. Current applications of eDNA are widespread, but the relatively new technology requires further refinement. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 157 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 154 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 34 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 16%
Student > Master 24 15%
Student > Bachelor 15 10%
Other 6 4%
Other 21 13%
Unknown 32 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 52 33%
Environmental Science 35 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 15%
Unspecified 5 3%
Engineering 2 1%
Other 5 3%
Unknown 34 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2017.
All research outputs
#13,465,597
of 22,865,319 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology Resources
#1,166
of 1,633 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,408
of 301,820 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology Resources
#18
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,865,319 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,633 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,820 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.