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Exploring the biophysical option space for feeding the world without deforestation

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
29 news outlets
blogs
13 blogs
twitter
372 tweeters
facebook
29 Facebook pages
googleplus
7 Google+ users
reddit
4 Redditors
video
3 video uploaders

Readers on

mendeley
262 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Exploring the biophysical option space for feeding the world without deforestation
Published in
Nature Communications, April 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms11382
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karl-Heinz Erb, Christian Lauk, Thomas Kastner, Andreas Mayer, Michaela C. Theurl, Helmut Haberl, Erb, Karl-Heinz, Lauk, Christian, Kastner, Thomas, Mayer, Andreas, Theurl, Michaela C, Haberl, Helmut

Abstract

Safeguarding the world's remaining forests is a high-priority goal. We assess the biophysical option space for feeding the world in 2050 in a hypothetical zero-deforestation world. We systematically combine realistic assumptions on future yields, agricultural areas, livestock feed and human diets. For each scenario, we determine whether the supply of crop products meets the demand and whether the grazing intensity stays within plausible limits. We find that many options exist to meet the global food supply in 2050 without deforestation, even at low crop-yield levels. Within the option space, individual scenarios differ greatly in terms of biomass harvest, cropland demand and grazing intensity, depending primarily on the quantitative and qualitative aspects of human diets. Grazing constraints strongly limit the option space. Without the option to encroach into natural or semi-natural land, trade volumes will rise in scenarios with globally converging diets, thereby decreasing the food self-sufficiency of many developing regions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 372 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 262 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 2%
Brazil 4 2%
United Kingdom 3 1%
Germany 2 <1%
Chile 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Other 7 3%
Unknown 232 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 78 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 71 27%
Student > Master 37 14%
Student > Bachelor 17 6%
Professor 16 6%
Other 43 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 92 35%
Environmental Science 88 34%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 15 6%
Unspecified 15 6%
Engineering 11 4%
Other 41 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 606. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2017.
All research outputs
#5,997
of 8,662,141 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#93
of 14,124 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#527
of 274,808 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#11
of 789 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,662,141 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,124 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 44.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,808 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 789 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.