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Zika virus infection during pregnancy and microcephaly occurrence: a review of literature and Brazilian data

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 602)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
13 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
367 Mendeley
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Title
Zika virus infection during pregnancy and microcephaly occurrence: a review of literature and Brazilian data
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases, May 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.bjid.2016.02.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Newton Sérgio De Carvalho, Beatriz Freitas De Carvalho, Cyllian Arias Fugaça, Bruna Dóris, Evellyn Silverio Biscaia

Abstract

In November of 2015, the Ministry of Health of Brazil published an announcement confirming the relationship between Zika virus and the microcephaly outbreak in the Northeast, suggesting that infected pregnant women might have transmitted the virus to their fetuses. The objectives of this study were to conduct a literature review about Zika virus infection and microcephaly, evaluate national and international epidemiological data, as well as the current recommendations for the health teams. Zika virus is an arbovirus, whose main vector is the Aedes sp. The main symptoms of the infection are maculopapular rash, fever, non-purulent conjunctivitis, and arthralgia. Transmission of this pathogen occurs mainly by mosquito bite, but there are also reports via the placenta. Microcephaly is defined as a measure of occipto-frontal circumference being more than two standard deviations below the mean for age and gender. The presence of microcephaly demands evaluation of the patient, in order to diagnose the etiology. Health authorities issued protocols, reports and notes concerning the management of microcephaly caused by Zika virus, but there is still controversy about managing the cases. The Ministry of Health advises notifying any suspected or confirmed cases of children with microcephaly related to the pathogen, which is confirmed by a positive specific laboratory test for the virus. The first choice for imaging exam in children with this malformation is transfontanellar ultrasound. The most effective way to control this outbreak of microcephaly probably caused by this virus is to combat the vector. Since there is still uncertainty about the period of vulnerability of transmission via placenta, the use of repellents is crucial throughout pregnancy. More investigations studying the consequences of this viral infection on the body of newborns and in their development are required.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 367 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 5 1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 358 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 71 19%
Student > Master 65 18%
Researcher 38 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 23 6%
Other 84 23%
Unknown 51 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 116 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 34 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 13 4%
Other 66 18%
Unknown 70 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 April 2020.
All research outputs
#1,379,329
of 20,523,918 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases
#16
of 602 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,811
of 277,357 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,523,918 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 602 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,357 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them