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Two-dimensional flow nanometry of biological nanoparticles for accurate determination of their size and emission intensity

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 X users
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1 patent

Citations

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34 Dimensions

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Two-dimensional flow nanometry of biological nanoparticles for accurate determination of their size and emission intensity
Published in
Nature Communications, September 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms12956
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephan Block, Björn Johansson Fast, Anders Lundgren, Vladimir P. Zhdanov, Fredrik Höök

Abstract

Biological nanoparticles (BNPs) are of high interest due to their key role in various biological processes and use as biomarkers. BNP size and composition are decisive for their functions, but simultaneous determination of both properties with high accuracy remains challenging. Optical microscopy allows precise determination of fluorescence/scattering intensity, but not the size of individual BNPs. The latter is better determined by tracking their random motion in bulk, but the limited illumination volume for tracking this motion impedes reliable intensity determination. Here, we show that by attaching BNPs to a supported lipid bilayer, subjecting them to hydrodynamic flows and tracking their motion via surface-sensitive optical imaging enable determination of their diffusion coefficients and flow-induced drifts, from which accurate quantification of both BNP size and emission intensity can be made. For vesicles, the accuracy of this approach is demonstrated by resolving the expected radius-squared dependence of their fluorescence intensity for radii down to 15 nm.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 3 8%
Unknown 36 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 41%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Master 3 8%
Professor 2 5%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 5%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 10 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 15%
Chemistry 5 13%
Engineering 4 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 9 23%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 June 2017.
All research outputs
#5,774,273
of 23,881,329 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#34,781
of 49,947 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,610
of 324,669 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#591
of 861 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,881,329 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 49,947 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 56.2. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 324,669 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 861 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.