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Hyperostosis frontalis interna in postmenopausal women—Possible relation to osteoporosis

Overview of attention for article published in Women & Health, April 2016
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Title
Hyperostosis frontalis interna in postmenopausal women—Possible relation to osteoporosis
Published in
Women & Health, April 2016
DOI 10.1080/03630242.2016.1178685
Pubmed ID
Authors

Danijela Djonic, Djurdja Bracanovic, Zoran Rakocevic, Miomira Ivovic, Slobodan Nikolic, Vladimir Zivkovic, Marija Djuric

Abstract

To improve our understanding of hyperostosis frontalis interna (HFI), we investigated whether HFI was accompanied by changes in the postcranial skeleton. Based on head CT scan analyses, 103 postmenopausal women were divided into controls without HFI and those with HFI in whom we measured the thickness of frontal, occipital and parietal bones. Women in the study underwent dual energy x-ray absorptiometry to analyze the bone density of the hip and vertebral region and external geometry of proximal femora. Additionally, all the women completed a questionnaire about symptoms and conditions which could be related to HFI. Women with HFI had a significantly higher prevalence of headache, neurological and psychiatric disorders and a significantly lower prevalence of having given birth. Increased bone thickness and altered bone structure in women with HFI was localized only on the skull, particularly on the frontal bone, probably due to specific properties of its underlying dura. Bone loss in the postcranial skeleton showed the same pattern in postmenopausal women with HFI as in those without HFI. Recording of HFI in medical records can be helpful in distinguishing whether reported disorders occur as a consequence of HFI or are related to other diseases but does not appear helpful in identifying women at risk of bone loss.

Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Master 3 13%
Other 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 10 43%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Psychology 2 9%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 10 43%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 April 2016.
All research outputs
#20,655,488
of 25,373,627 outputs
Outputs from Women & Health
#667
of 785 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#233,319
of 313,412 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Women & Health
#15
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,373,627 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 785 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 313,412 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.