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The connecting health and technology study: a 6-month randomized controlled trial to improve nutrition behaviours using a mobile food record and text messaging support in young adults

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
32 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
55 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
206 Mendeley
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Title
The connecting health and technology study: a 6-month randomized controlled trial to improve nutrition behaviours using a mobile food record and text messaging support in young adults
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0376-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Deborah A. Kerr, Amelia J. Harray, Christina M. Pollard, Satvinder S. Dhaliwal, Edward J. Delp, Peter A. Howat, Mark R. Pickering, Ziad Ahmad, Xingqiong Meng, Iain S. Pratt, Janine L. Wright, Katherine R. Kerr, Carol J. Boushey, Kerr, Deborah A, Harray, Amelia J, Pollard, Christina M, Dhaliwal, Satvinder S, Delp, Edward J, Howat, Peter A, Pickering, Mark R, Ahmad, Ziad, Meng, Xingqiong, Pratt, Iain S, Wright, Janine L, Kerr, Katherine R, Boushey, Carol J, Kerr, D

Abstract

Early adulthood represents the transition to independent living which is a period when changes in diet and body weight are likely to occur. This presents an ideal time for health interventions to reduce the effect of health problems and risk factors for chronic disease in later life. As young adults are high users of mobile devices, interventions that use this technology may improve engagement. The Connecting Health and Technology study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of tailored dietary feedback and weekly text messaging to improve dietary intake of fruit, vegetables and junk food over 6 months among a population-based sample of men and women (aged 18-30 years). A three-arm, parallel, randomized control trial was conducted. After baseline assessments, participants were randomized to one of three groups: A) dietary feedback and weekly text messages, B) dietary feedback only or C) control group. Dietary intake was assessed using a mobile food record App (mFR) where participants captured images of foods and beverages consumed over 4-days at baseline and post-intervention. The primary outcomes were changes in serves of fruits, vegetables, energy-dense nutrient-poor (EDNP) foods and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB). The intervention effects were assessed using linear mixed effect models for change in food group serves. Young adults (n = 247) were randomized to group A (n = 82), group B (n = 83), or group C (n = 82). Overall, no changes in food group serves for either intervention groups were observed. An unanticipated outcome was a mean weight reduction of 1.7 kg (P = .02) among the dietary feedback only. Men who received dietary feedback only, significantly reduced their serves of EDNP foods by a mean of 1.4 serves/day (P = .02). Women who received dietary feedback only significantly reduced their intake of SSB (P = .04) by an average of 0.2 serves/day compared with controls. Tailored dietary feedback only resulted in a decrease in EDNP foods in men and SSB in women, together with a reduction in body weight. Using a mobile food record for dietary assessment and tailored feedback has great potential for future health promotion interventions targeting diet and weight in young adults. Australian Clinical Trials Registry Registration number: ACTRN12612000250831 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 206 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 203 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 45 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 16%
Student > Bachelor 24 12%
Researcher 19 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 9%
Other 36 17%
Unknown 31 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 41 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 39 19%
Psychology 23 11%
Social Sciences 9 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 4%
Other 36 17%
Unknown 49 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 30. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2019.
All research outputs
#593,388
of 14,067,552 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#264
of 1,427 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,281
of 262,273 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#4
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,067,552 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,427 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,273 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.