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Enhanced transmission of malaria parasites to mosquitoes in a murine model of type 2 diabetes

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Enhanced transmission of malaria parasites to mosquitoes in a murine model of type 2 diabetes
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1277-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nazzy Pakpour, Kong Wai Cheung, Shirley Luckhart

Abstract

More than half of the world's population is at risk of malaria and simultaneously, many malaria-endemic regions are facing dramatic increases in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Studies in murine malaria models have examined the impact of malaria infection on type 2 diabetes pathology, it remains unclear how this chronic metabolic disorder impacts the transmission of malaria. In this report, the ability type 2 diabetic rodents infected with malaria to transmit parasites to Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes is quantified. The infection prevalence and intensity of An. stephensi mosquitoes that fed upon control or type 2 diabetic C57BL/6 db/db mice infected with either lethal Plasmodium berghei NK65 or non-lethal Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL murine malaria strains were determined. Daily parasitaemias were also recorded. A higher percentage of mosquitoes (87.5 vs 61.5 % for P. yoelii and 76.9 vs 50 % for P. berghei) became infected following blood feeding on Plasmodium-infected type 2 diabetic mice compared to mosquitoes that fed on infected control animals, despite no significant differences in circulating gametocyte levels. These results suggest that type 2 diabetic mice infected with malaria are more efficient at infecting mosquitoes, raising the question of whether a similar synergy exists in humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 36%
Other 2 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Researcher 2 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 14%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 21%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 14%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2016.
All research outputs
#3,149,858
of 7,625,034 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,219
of 2,569 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,849
of 267,376 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#92
of 166 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,625,034 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,569 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,376 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 166 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.