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Parental physical and lifestyle factors and their association with newborn body composition

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, April 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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57 Mendeley
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Title
Parental physical and lifestyle factors and their association with newborn body composition
Published in
British Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, April 2016
DOI 10.1111/1471-0528.14042
Pubmed ID
Authors

FP McCarthy, AS Khashan, D Murray, M Kiely, J O'B Hourihane, D Pasupathy, LC Kenny

Abstract

To investigate the parental physical and lifestyle determinants of newborn body composition. Prospective cohort study. Cork University Maternity Hospital, a tertiary referral hospital in Cork, Ireland. All babies were recruited as part of a prospective birth cohort, Babies After SCOPE: Evaluating the Longitudinal Impact Using Neurological and Nutritional Endpoints (BASELINE). These babies were recruited from women who had participated in the Screening of Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study Ireland, a prospective, multicentre cohort study METHODS: Multivariate linear regression was used to analyse the effect of a range of maternal and paternal physical and lifestyle features on neonatal body fat percentage (BF%). Neonatal BF%. Neonatal adiposity was assessed within 48 hours of birth using air displacement plethysmography (PEAPOD(®) ). In all, 1243 infants were enrolled in the study. Increasing maternal body mass index (adjusted mean difference 0.09; 0.04, 0.15) and waist height ratio (adjusted mean difference 6.59; 0.27, 12.92) were significantly associated with increased neonatal BF%. In contrast, maternal smoking was associated with reduced neonatal BF% compared with non smokers (adjusted mean difference -0.55; -1.07, -0.03). Infant sex significantly altered neonatal BF%, with female infants having higher neonatal BF% compared with male infants (adjusted mean difference 1.98; 1.54, 2.53). No association was observed between paternal body mass index (BMI), paternal age or paternal smoking and neonatal BF%. Maternal smoking, BMI, waist height ratio and infant sex were associated with altered BF%. Maternal smoking, BMI, waist height ratio and infant sex are associated with altered neonatal body fat percentage.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ireland 1 2%
Unknown 56 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 12%
Student > Master 7 12%
Other 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Other 14 25%
Unknown 12 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 11%
Psychology 4 7%
Sports and Recreations 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 15 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 July 2018.
All research outputs
#5,670,045
of 20,413,997 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
#2,596
of 6,343 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,223
of 277,046 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
#60
of 114 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,413,997 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,343 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,046 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 114 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.