↓ Skip to main content

Rewiring neuronal microcircuits of the brain via spine head protrusions-a role for synaptopodin and intracellular calcium stores

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica Communications, April 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Rewiring neuronal microcircuits of the brain via spine head protrusions-a role for synaptopodin and intracellular calcium stores
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica Communications, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40478-016-0311-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Verbich, Denise Becker, Andreas Vlachos, Peter Mundel, Thomas Deller, R. Anne McKinney

Abstract

Neurological diseases associated with neuronal death are also accompanied by axonal denervation of connected brain regions. In these areas, denervation leads to a decrease in afferent drive, which may in turn trigger active central nervous system (CNS) circuitry rearrangement. This rewiring process is important therapeutically, since it can partially recover functions and can be further enhanced using modern rehabilitation strategies. Nevertheless, the cellular mechanisms of brain rewiring are not fully understood. We recently reported a mechanism by which neurons remodel their local connectivity under conditions of network-perturbance: hippocampal pyramidal cells can extend spine head protrusions (SHPs), which reach out toward neighboring terminals and form new synapses. Since this form of activity-dependent rewiring is observed only on some spines, we investigated the required conditions. We speculated, that the actin-associated protein synaptopodin, which is involved in several synaptic plasticity mechanisms, could play a role in the formation and/or stabilization of SHPs. Using hippocampal slice cultures, we found that ~70 % of spines with protrusions in CA1 pyramidal neurons contained synaptopodin. Analysis of synaptopodin-deficient neurons revealed that synaptopodin is required for the stability but not the formation of SHPs. The effects of synaptopodin could be linked to its role in Ca(2+) homeostasis, since spines with protrusions often contained ryanodine receptors and synaptopodin. Furthermore, disrupting Ca(2+) signaling shortened protrusion lifetime. By transgenically reintroducing synaptopodin on a synaptopodin-deficient background, SHP stability could be rescued. Overall, we show that synaptopodin increases the stability of SHPs, and could potentially modulate the rewiring of microcircuitries by making synaptic reorganization more efficient.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 3%
France 1 3%
Unknown 32 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 24%
Researcher 7 21%
Student > Master 6 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 12 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Psychology 2 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2016.
All research outputs
#3,924,456
of 7,591,700 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#244
of 356 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#144,502
of 266,391 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#24
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,591,700 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 356 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,391 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.