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Regulation of the stress response by the gut microbiota: Implications for psychoneuroendocrinology

Overview of attention for article published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, April 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 X users
facebook
30 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
439 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1127 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Regulation of the stress response by the gut microbiota: Implications for psychoneuroendocrinology
Published in
Psychoneuroendocrinology, April 2012
DOI 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2012.03.007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Timothy G. Dinan, John F. Cryan

Abstract

There is now an expanding volume of evidence to support the view that commensal organisms within the gut play a role in early programming and later responsivity of the stress system. The gut is inhabited by 10¹³-10¹⁴ micro-organisms, which is ten times the number of cells in the human body and contains 150 times as many genes as our genome. It has long been recognised that gut pathogens such as Escherichia coli, if they enter the gut can activate the HPA. However, animals raised in a germ-free environment show exaggerated HPA responses to psychological stress, which normalises with monocolonisation by certain bacterial species including Bifidobacterium infantis. Moreover, increased evidence suggests that animals treated with probiotics have a blunted HPA response. Stress induces increased permeability of the gut allowing bacteria and bacterial antigens to cross the epithelial barrier and activate a mucosal immune response, which in turn alters the composition of the microbiome and leads to enhanced HPA drive. Increasing data from patients with irritable bowel syndrome and major depression indicate that in these syndromes alteration of the HPA may be induced by increased gut permeability. In the case of irritable bowel syndrome the increased permeability can respond to probiotic therapy. Detailed prospective studies in patients with mood disorders examining the gut microbiota, immune parameters and HPA activity are required to throw further light on this emerging area. It is however clear that the gut microbiota must be taken into account when considering the factors regulating the HPA.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 15 1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Ireland 3 <1%
France 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Other 10 <1%
Unknown 1088 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 185 16%
Student > Master 170 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 166 15%
Researcher 143 13%
Student > Postgraduate 66 6%
Other 193 17%
Unknown 204 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 245 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 207 18%
Psychology 106 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 85 8%
Neuroscience 70 6%
Other 171 15%
Unknown 243 22%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 54. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2021.
All research outputs
#775,531
of 25,387,480 outputs
Outputs from Psychoneuroendocrinology
#228
of 3,899 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,584
of 170,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychoneuroendocrinology
#1
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,387,480 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,899 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 170,317 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.