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Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
15 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
twitter
248 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
Title
Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years
Published in
Scientific Reports, April 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep25061
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sapna Sharma, John J. Magnuson, Ryan D. Batt, Luke A. Winslow, Johanna Korhonen, Yasuyuki Aono

Abstract

Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443-2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693-2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 248 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Belgium 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Estonia 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 82 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 30%
Researcher 18 20%
Student > Master 14 16%
Other 7 8%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 7 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 28%
Environmental Science 19 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 17 19%
Chemistry 6 7%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 10 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 343. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 August 2019.
All research outputs
#34,984
of 14,009,177 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#472
of 70,874 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,429
of 262,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#28
of 3,102 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,009,177 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 70,874 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,372 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,102 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.