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How to do (or not to do)… gender analysis in health systems research

Overview of attention for article published in Health Policy & Planning, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 1,924)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
3 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
130 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
63 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
243 Mendeley
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Title
How to do (or not to do)… gender analysis in health systems research
Published in
Health Policy & Planning, April 2016
DOI 10.1093/heapol/czw037
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rosemary Morgan, Asha George, Sarah Ssali, Kate Hawkins, Sassy Molyneux, Sally Theobald

Abstract

Gender-the socially constructed roles, behaviours, activities and attributes that a given society considers appropriate for males, females and other genders-affects how people live, work and relate to each other at all levels, including in relation to the health system. Health systems research (HSR) aims to inform more strategic, effective and equitable health systems interventions, programs and policies; and the inclusion of gender analysis into HSR is a core part of that endeavour. We outline what gender analysis is and how gender analysis can be incorporated into HSR content, process and outcomes Starting with HSR content, i.e. the substantive focus of HSR, we recommend exploring whether and how gender power relations affect females and males in health systems through the use of sex disaggregated data, gender frameworks and questions. Sex disaggregation flags female-male differences or similarities that warrant further analysis; and further analysis is guided by gender frameworks and questions to understand how gender power relations are constituted and negotiated in health systems. Critical aspects of understanding gender power relations include examining who has what (access to resources); who does what (the division of labour and everyday practices); how values are defined (social norms) and who decides (rules and decision-making). Secondly, we examine gender in HSR process by reflecting on how the research process itself is imbued with power relations. We focus on data collection and analysis by reviewing who participates as respondents; when data is collected and where; who is present; who collects data and who analyses data. Thirdly, we consider gender and HSR outcomes by considering who is empowered and disempowered as a result of HSR, including the extent to which HSR outcomes progressively transform gender power relations in health systems, or at least do not further exacerbate them.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 130 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 243 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 1%
Canada 2 <1%
Sierra Leone 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 236 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 53 22%
Student > Master 51 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 7%
Other 15 6%
Other 43 18%
Unknown 31 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 68 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 50 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 32 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 7 3%
Psychology 7 3%
Other 31 13%
Unknown 48 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 105. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2021.
All research outputs
#217,232
of 16,597,904 outputs
Outputs from Health Policy & Planning
#17
of 1,924 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,001
of 266,805 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Policy & Planning
#1
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,597,904 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,924 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,805 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.