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Accumulation of impact markers in desert wetlands and implications for the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
12 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Accumulation of impact markers in desert wetlands and implications for the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2012
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1200296109
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. S. Pigati, C. Latorre, J. A. Rech, J. L. Betancourt, K. E. Martinez, J. R. Budahn

Abstract

The Younger Dryas impact hypothesis contends that an extraterrestrial object exploded over North America at 12.9 ka, initiating the Younger Dryas cold event, the extinction of many North American megafauna, and the demise of the Clovis archeological culture. Although the exact nature and location of the proposed impact or explosion remain unclear, alleged evidence for the fallout comes from multiple sites across North America and a site in Belgium. At 6 of the 10 original sites (excluding the Carolina Bays), elevated concentrations of various "impact markers" were found in association with black mats that date to the onset of the Younger Dryas. Black mats are common features in paleowetland deposits and typically represent shallow marsh environments. In this study, we investigated black mats ranging in age from approximately 6 to more than 40 ka in the southwestern United States and the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. At 10 of 13 sites, we found elevated concentrations of iridium in bulk and magnetic sediments, magnetic spherules, and/or titanomagnetite grains within or at the base of black mats, regardless of their age or location, suggesting that elevated concentrations of these markers arise from processes common to wetland systems, and not a catastrophic extraterrestrial impact event.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 5%
United Kingdom 2 3%
Chile 2 3%
France 2 3%
Brazil 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
Israel 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Czechia 1 1%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 55 74%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 20%
Professor 10 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 14%
Student > Master 10 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Other 22 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 30 41%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 20%
Environmental Science 9 12%
Social Sciences 7 9%
Unspecified 3 4%
Other 12 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 January 2014.
All research outputs
#473,324
of 12,365,005 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#9,368
of 77,326 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,740
of 117,054 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#112
of 907 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,365,005 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,326 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 117,054 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 907 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.