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Different Cranial Ontogeny in Europeans and Southern Africans

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, April 2012
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Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Different Cranial Ontogeny in Europeans and Southern Africans
Published in
PLoS ONE, April 2012
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0035917
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marina L. Sardi, Fernando V. Ramírez Rozzi

Abstract

Modern human populations differ in developmental processes and in several phenotypic traits. However, the link between ontogenetic variation and human diversification has not been frequently addressed. Here, we analysed craniofacial ontogenies by means of geometric-morphometrics of Europeans and Southern Africans, according to dental and chronological ages. Results suggest that different adult cranial morphologies between Southern Africans and Europeans arise by a combination of processes that involve traits modified during the prenatal life and others that diverge during early postnatal ontogeny. Main craniofacial changes indicate that Europeans differ from Southern Africans by increasing facial developmental rates and extending the attainment of adult size and shape. Since other studies have suggested that native subsaharan populations attain adulthood earlier than Europeans, it is probable that facial ontogeny is linked with other developmental mechanisms that control the timing of maturation in other variables. Southern Africans appear as retaining young features in adulthood. Facial ontogeny in Europeans produces taller and narrower noses, which seems as an adaptation to colder environments. The lack of these morphological traits in Neanderthals, who lived in cold environments, seems a paradox, but it is probably the consequence of a warm-adapted faces together with precocious maturation. When modern Homo sapiens migrated into Asia and Europe, colder environments might establish pressures that constrained facial growth and development in order to depart from the warm-adapted morphology. Our results provide some answers about how cranial growth and development occur in two human populations and when developmental shifts take place providing a better adaptation to environmental constraints.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
Argentina 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 43 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 28%
Student > Master 6 13%
Researcher 6 13%
Professor 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 45%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 9%
Arts and Humanities 3 6%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2012.
All research outputs
#9,311,695
of 15,201,977 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#87,410
of 153,719 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,871
of 126,055 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,813
of 3,104 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,201,977 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 153,719 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.8. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 126,055 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,104 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.