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Effect of fatigue caused by a simulated handball game on ball throwing velocity, shoulder muscle strength and balance ratio: a prospective study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, May 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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78 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of fatigue caused by a simulated handball game on ball throwing velocity, shoulder muscle strength and balance ratio: a prospective study
Published in
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13102-016-0038-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marília Santos Andrade, Fabiana de Carvalho Koffes, Ana Amélia Benedito-Silva, Antonio Carlos da Silva, Claudio Andre Barbosa de Lira

Abstract

Arm throwing represents a deciding element in handball. Ball velocity, aim accuracy, and dynamic stability of the shoulder are factors that influence throwing effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of muscle fatigue caused by simulated game activities (SGA) on shoulder rotational isokinetic muscle strength, muscle balance and throwing performance, and to examine the relationship between muscle strength and throwing performance. Ten national elite adult handball athletes were evaluated. Isokinetic internal (IR), external (ER) rotators peak torque, and balance ratio were measured before and after SGA. Ball throwing velocity was assessed by radar gun. Both internal (IR) and external (ER) rotators peak torque were significantly lower after SGA (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.02, respectively). However, the deleterious effect was more evident for IR than ER muscles (effect size r = 0.39 and r = 0.18, respectively). Balance ratio before and after SGA did not differ (p = 0.06). Ball throwing velocity was not impaired by SGA. Moreover, isokinetic variables correlated positively with ball velocity (r ≥ 0.67). SGA affected the muscle strength of IR more than ER, predisposing the shoulder joint to muscular imbalance. The muscular impairment after SGA was insufficient to impair ball throwing velocity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 76 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 15%
Student > Master 10 13%
Student > Postgraduate 5 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 17 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 35 45%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 1%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 20 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2019.
All research outputs
#3,268,890
of 14,619,289 outputs
Outputs from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#86
of 213 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,555
of 261,246 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,619,289 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 213 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,246 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them