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Genomes and secretomes of Ascomycota fungi reveal diverse functions in plant biomass decomposition and pathogenesis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, December 2019
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

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7 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

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61 Mendeley
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Title
Genomes and secretomes of Ascomycota fungi reveal diverse functions in plant biomass decomposition and pathogenesis
Published in
BMC Genomics, December 2019
DOI 10.1186/s12864-019-6358-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jean F. Challacombe, Cedar N. Hesse, Lisa M. Bramer, Lee Ann McCue, Mary Lipton, Samuel Purvine, Carrie Nicora, La Verne Gallegos-Graves, Andrea Porras-Alfaro, Cheryl R. Kuske

Abstract

The dominant fungi in arid grasslands and shrublands are members of the Ascomycota phylum. Ascomycota fungi are important drivers in carbon and nitrogen cycling in arid ecosystems. These fungi play roles in soil stability, plant biomass decomposition, and endophytic interactions with plants. They may also form symbiotic associations with biocrust components or be latent saprotrophs or pathogens that live on plant tissues. However, their functional potential in arid soils, where organic matter, nutrients and water are very low or only periodically available, is poorly characterized. Five Ascomycota fungi were isolated from different soil crust microhabitats and rhizosphere soils around the native bunchgrass Pleuraphis jamesii in an arid grassland near Moab, UT, USA. Putative genera were Coniochaeta, isolated from lichen biocrust, Embellisia from cyanobacteria biocrust, Chaetomium from below lichen biocrust, Phoma from a moss microhabitat, and Aspergillus from the soil. The fungi were grown in replicate cultures on different carbon sources (chitin, native bunchgrass or pine wood) relevant to plant biomass and soil carbon sources. Secretomes produced by the fungi on each substrate were characterized. Results demonstrate that these fungi likely interact with primary producers (biocrust or plants) by secreting a wide range of proteins that facilitate symbiotic associations. Each of the fungal isolates secreted enzymes that degrade plant biomass, small secreted effector proteins, and proteins involved in either beneficial plant interactions or virulence. Aspergillus and Phoma expressed more plant biomass degrading enzymes when grown in grass- and pine-containing cultures than in chitin. Coniochaeta and Embellisia expressed similar numbers of these enzymes under all conditions, while Chaetomium secreted more of these enzymes in grass-containing cultures. This study of Ascomycota genomes and secretomes provides important insights about the lifestyles and the roles that Ascomycota fungi likely play in arid grassland, ecosystems. However, the exact nature of those interactions, whether any or all of the isolates are true endophytes, latent saprotrophs or opportunistic phytopathogens, will be the topic of future studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 11%
Student > Master 6 10%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 16 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 15%
Environmental Science 7 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 17 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 April 2020.
All research outputs
#5,448,710
of 17,436,984 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#2,883
of 9,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,394
of 399,706 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#237
of 817 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,436,984 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,304 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 399,706 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 817 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.