↓ Skip to main content

MNase titration reveals differences between nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, May 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
78 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
210 Mendeley
Title
MNase titration reveals differences between nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility
Published in
Nature Communications, May 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms11485
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jakub Mieczkowski, April Cook, Sarah K. Bowman, Britta Mueller, Burak H. Alver, Sharmistha Kundu, Aimee M. Deaton, Jennifer A. Urban, Erica Larschan, Peter J. Park, Robert E. Kingston, Michael Y. Tolstorukov

Abstract

Chromatin accessibility plays a fundamental role in gene regulation. Nucleosome placement, usually measured by quantifying protection of DNA from enzymatic digestion, can regulate accessibility. We introduce a metric that uses micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion in a novel manner to measure chromatin accessibility by combining information from several digests of increasing depths. This metric, MACC (MNase accessibility), quantifies the inherent heterogeneity of nucleosome accessibility in which some nucleosomes are seen preferentially at high MNase and some at low MNase. MACC interrogates each genomic locus, measuring both nucleosome location and accessibility in the same assay. MACC can be performed either with or without a histone immunoprecipitation step, and thereby compares histone and non-histone protection. We find that changes in accessibility at enhancers, promoters and other regulatory regions do not correlate with changes in nucleosome occupancy. Moreover, high nucleosome occupancy does not necessarily preclude high accessibility, which reveals novel principles of chromatin regulation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 210 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 3%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 201 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 68 32%
Researcher 51 24%
Unspecified 20 10%
Student > Bachelor 20 10%
Student > Master 16 8%
Other 35 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 85 40%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 84 40%
Unspecified 23 11%
Computer Science 4 2%
Engineering 4 2%
Other 10 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2018.
All research outputs
#1,979,342
of 13,807,706 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#14,727
of 25,261 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,937
of 262,080 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#157
of 260 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,807,706 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 25,261 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.7. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,080 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 260 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.