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Biomarkers reveal sea turtles remained in oiled areas following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Overview of attention for article published in Ecological Applications, September 2016
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Title
Biomarkers reveal sea turtles remained in oiled areas following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill
Published in
Ecological Applications, September 2016
DOI 10.1002/eap.1366
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hannah B. Vander Zanden, Alan B. Bolten, Anton D. Tucker, Kristen M. Hart, Margaret M. Lamont, Ikuko Fujisaki, Kimberly J. Reich, David S. Addison, Katherine L. Mansfield, Katrina F. Phillips, Mariela Pajuelo, Karen A. Bjorndal

Abstract

Assessments of large-scale disasters, such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, are problematic because while measurements of post-disturbance conditions are common, measurements of pre-disturbance baselines are only rarely available. Without adequate observations of pre-disaster organismal and environmental conditions, it is impossible to assess the impact of such catastrophes on animal populations and ecological communities. Here, we use long-term biological tissue records to provide pre-disaster data for a vulnerable marine organism. Keratin samples from the carapace of loggerhead sea turtles record the foraging history for up to 18 years, allowing us to evaluate the effect of the oil spill on sea turtle foraging patterns. Samples were collected from 76 satellite-tracked adult loggerheads in 2011 and 2012, approximately one to two years after the spill. Of the 10 individuals that foraged in areas exposed to surface oil, none demonstrated significant changes in foraging patterns post spill. The observed long-term fidelity to foraging sites indicates that loggerheads in the northern Gulf of Mexico likely remained in established foraging sites, regardless of the introduction of oil and chemical dispersants. More research is needed to address potential long-term health consequences to turtles in this region. Mobile marine organisms present challenges for researchers to monitor effects of environmental disasters, both spatially and temporally. We demonstrate that biological tissues can reveal long-term histories of animal behavior and provide critical pre-disaster baselines following an anthropogenic disturbance or natural disaster.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 111 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 111 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 31 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 10%
Student > Master 11 10%
Student > Bachelor 11 10%
Other 7 6%
Other 15 14%
Unknown 25 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 33 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Engineering 3 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 3%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 30 27%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 September 2016.
All research outputs
#8,155,694
of 24,453,338 outputs
Outputs from Ecological Applications
#1,814
of 3,324 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,208
of 327,561 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecological Applications
#32
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,453,338 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,324 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.7. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 327,561 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.