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Isotemporal substitution of inactive time with physical activity and time in bed: cross-sectional associations with cardiometabolic health in the PREDIMED-Plus study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, December 2019
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
27 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
117 Mendeley
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Title
Isotemporal substitution of inactive time with physical activity and time in bed: cross-sectional associations with cardiometabolic health in the PREDIMED-Plus study
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, December 2019
DOI 10.1186/s12966-019-0892-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aina M. Galmes-Panades, Veronica Varela-Mato, Jadwiga Konieczna, Julia Wärnberg, Miguel Ángel Martínez-González, Jordi Salas-Salvadó, Dolores Corella, Helmut Schröder, Jesús Vioque, Ángel M. Alonso-Gómez, J. Alfredo Martínez, Luís Serra-Majem, Ramon Estruch, Francisco J. Tinahones, José Lapetra, Xavier Pintó, Josep A. Tur, Antonio Garcia-Rios, Blanca Riquelme-Gallego, José Juan Gaforio, Pilar Matía-Martín, Lidia Daimiel, Rafael Manuel Micó Pérez, Josep Vidal, Clotilde Vázquez, Emilio Ros, Ana Garcia-Arellano, Andrés Díaz-López, Eva M. Asensio, Olga Castañer, Francisca Fiol, Luis Alfredo Mira-Castejón, Anai Moreno Rodríguez, Juan Carlos Benavente- Marín, Itziar Abete, Laura Tomaino, Rosa Casas, F. Javier Barón López, José Carlos Fernández-García, José Manuel Santos-Lozano, Ana Galera, Catalina M. Mascaró, Cristina Razquin, Christopher Papandreou, Olga Portoles, Karla Alejandra Pérez-Vega, Miguel Fiol, Laura Compañ-Gabucio, Jessica Vaquero-Luna, Miguel Ruiz-Canela, Nerea Becerra-Tomás, Montserrat Fitó, Dora Romaguera

Abstract

© 2019 The Author(s). Background: This study explored the association between inactive time and measures of adiposity, clinical parameters, obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome components. It further examined the impact of reallocating inactive time to time in bed, light physical activity (LPA) or moderate-To-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) on cardio-metabolic risk factors, including measures of adiposity and body composition, biochemical parameters and blood pressure in older adults. Methods: This is a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 2189 Caucasian men and women (age 55-75 years, BMI 27-40 Kg/m2) from the PREDIMED-Plus study (http://www.predimedplus.com/). All participants had ≥3 components of the metabolic syndrome. Inactive time, physical activity and time in bed were objectively determined using triaxial accelerometers GENEActiv during 7 days (ActivInsights Ltd., Kimbolton, United Kingdom). Multiple adjusted linear and logistic regression models were used. Isotemporal substitution regression modelling was performed to assess the relationship of replacing the amount of time spent in one activity for another, on each outcome, including measures of adiposity and body composition, biochemical parameters and blood pressure in older adults. Results: Inactive time was associated with indicators of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Reallocating 30 min per day of inactive time to 30 min per day of time in bed was associated with lower BMI, waist circumference and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (all p-values < 0.05). Reallocating 30 min per day of inactive time with 30 min per day of LPA or MVPA was associated with lower BMI, waist circumference, total fat, visceral adipose tissue, HbA1c, glucose, triglycerides, and higher body muscle mass and HDL cholesterol (all p-values < 0.05). Conclusions: Inactive time was associated with a poor cardio-metabolic profile. Isotemporal substitution of inactive time with MVPA and LPA or time in bed could have beneficial impact on cardio-metabolic health. Trial registration: The trial was registered at the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial (ISRCTN: http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN89898870) with number 89898870 and registration date of 24 July 2014, retrospectively registered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 117 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 17%
Student > Master 14 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 10%
Researcher 11 9%
Other 6 5%
Other 18 15%
Unknown 36 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 15%
Sports and Recreations 9 8%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 19 16%
Unknown 44 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2021.
All research outputs
#1,094,444
of 18,523,374 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#478
of 1,714 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,760
of 402,868 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#53
of 139 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,523,374 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,714 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 402,868 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 139 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.