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Symptom variability over the course of the day in patients with stable COPD in Brazil: a real-world observational study

Overview of attention for article published in Jornal brasileiro de pneumologia : publicacao oficial da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisilogia, June 2020
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Title
Symptom variability over the course of the day in patients with stable COPD in Brazil: a real-world observational study
Published in
Jornal brasileiro de pneumologia : publicacao oficial da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisilogia, June 2020
DOI 10.36416/1806-3756/e20190223
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alberto Cukier, Irma de Godoy, Claudia Henrique da Costa, Adalberto Sperb Rubin, Marcelo Gervilla Gregorio, Aldo Agra de Albuquerque Neto, Marina Andrade Lima, Monica Corso Pereira, Suzana Erico Tanni, Rodrigo Abensur Athanazio, Elizabeth Jauhar Cardoso Bessa, ernando Cesar Wehrmeister, Cristina Bassi Lourenco, Ana Maria Baptista Menezes

Abstract

To analyze symptoms at different times of day in patients with COPD. This was a multicenter, cross-sectional observational study conducted at eight centers in Brazil. We evaluated morning, daytime, and nighttime symptoms in patients with stable COPD. We included 593 patients under regular treatment, of whom 309 (52.1%) were male and 92 (15.5%) were active smokers. The mean age was 67.7 years, and the mean FEV1 was 49.4% of the predicted value. In comparison with the patients who had mild or moderate symptoms, the 183 (30.8%) with severe symptoms were less physically active (p = 0.002), had greater airflow limitation (p < 0.001), had more outpatient exacerbations (p = 0.002) and more inpatient exacerbations (p = 0.043), as well as scoring worse on specific instruments. The most common morning and nighttime symptoms were dyspnea (in 45.2% and 33.1%, respectively), cough (in 37.5% and 33.3%, respectively), and wheezing (in 24.4% and 27.0%, respectively). The intensity of daytime symptoms correlated strongly with that of morning symptoms (r = 0.65, p < 0.001) and that of nighttime symptoms (r = 0.60, p < 0.001), as well as with the COPD Assessment Test score (r = 0.62; p < 0.001), although it showed only a weak correlation with FEV1 (r = -0.205; p < 0.001). Dyspnea was more common in the morning than at night. Having morning or nighttime symptoms was associated with greater daytime symptom severity. Symptom intensity was strongly associated with poor quality of life and with the frequency of exacerbations, although it was weakly associated with airflow limitation.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 5 42%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Unknown 5 42%