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The phosphorus mass balance: identifying ‘hotspots’ in the food system as a roadmap to phosphorus security

Overview of attention for article published in Current Opinion in Biotechnology, December 2012
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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49 Dimensions

Readers on

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141 Mendeley
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Title
The phosphorus mass balance: identifying ‘hotspots’ in the food system as a roadmap to phosphorus security
Published in
Current Opinion in Biotechnology, December 2012
DOI 10.1016/j.copbio.2012.03.010
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dana Cordell, Tina-Simone Schmid Neset, Timothy Prior

Abstract

Phosphorus is a critical element on which all life depends. Global crop production depends on fertilisers derived from phosphate rock to maintain high crop yields. Population increase, changing dietary preferences towards more meat and dairy products, and the continuing intensification of global agriculture supporting this expansion will place increasing pressure on an uncertain, but finite supply of high-quality phosphate rock. Growing concern about phosphorus scarcity and security, coupled with the environmental impact of phosphorus pollution, has encouraged an increase in research exploring how phosphorus is used and lost in the food system-from mine to field to fork. An assessment of recent phosphorus flows analyses at different geographical scales identifies the key phosphorus 'hotspots', for example within the mining, agriculture or food processing sectors, where efficiency and reuse can be substantially improved through biotechnological approaches coupled with policy changes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 141 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Slovenia 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Burkina Faso 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 132 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 24%
Researcher 24 17%
Student > Bachelor 9 6%
Unspecified 8 6%
Other 31 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 42 30%
Engineering 27 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 18%
Unspecified 17 12%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 7%
Other 19 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 May 2012.
All research outputs
#9,791,237
of 12,255,274 outputs
Outputs from Current Opinion in Biotechnology
#1,700
of 1,915 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,397
of 114,149 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Opinion in Biotechnology
#33
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,255,274 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,915 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 114,149 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.