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Field evaluation of two novel sampling devices for collecting wild oviposition site seeking malaria vector mosquitoes: OviART gravid traps and squares of electrocuting nets

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, May 2016
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3 tweeters

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8 Dimensions

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Field evaluation of two novel sampling devices for collecting wild oviposition site seeking malaria vector mosquitoes: OviART gravid traps and squares of electrocuting nets
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13071-016-1557-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sisay Dugassa, Jenny M. Lindh, Steven W. Lindsay, Ulrike Fillinger

Abstract

New sampling tools are needed for collecting exophilic malaria mosquitoes in sub-Saharan Africa to monitor the impact of vector control interventions. The OviART gravid trap and squares of electrocuting nets (e-nets) were recently developed under semi-field conditions for collecting oviposition site seeking Anopheles gambiae (sensu stricto) (s.s.). This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of these traps for sampling malaria vectors under field conditions. Prior to field testing, two modifications to the prototype OviART gravid trap were evaluated by (i) increasing the surface area and volume of water in the artificial pond which forms part of the trap, and (ii) increasing the strength of the suction fan. Six sampling tools targeting gravid females (Box gravid trap, detergent-treated ponds, e-nets insect glue-treated ponds, sticky boards and sticky floating-acetate sheets) were compared under field conditions to evaluate their relative catching performance and to select a method for comparison with the OviART gravid trap. Finally, the trapping efficacy of the OviART gravid trap and the square of e-nets were compared with a Box gravid trap during the long rainy season in three household clusters in western Kenya. The OviART gravid trap prototype's catch size was doubled by increasing the pond size [rate ratio (RR) 1.9; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.1-3.4] but a stronger fan did not improve the catch. The square of e-nets performed better than the other devices, collecting three times more gravid Anopheles spp. than the Box gravid trap (RR 3.3; 95 % CI 1.4-7.6). The OviART gravid trap collections were comparable to those from the e-nets and 3.3 (95 % CI 1.5-7.0) times higher than the number of An. gambiae senso lato (s.l.) collected by the Box gravid trap. Both OviART gravid trap and squares of e-nets collected wild gravid Anopheles gambiae (s.l.) where natural habitats were within 200-400 m of the trap. Whilst the e-nets are difficult to handle and might therefore only be useful as a research device, the OviART gravid trap presents a promising new surveillance tool. Further field testing is needed in different eco-epidemiological settings to provide recommendations for its use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 16%
Student > Master 8 16%
Other 7 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 13 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 20%
Engineering 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 13 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 May 2017.
All research outputs
#6,246,098
of 10,799,478 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,445
of 2,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,207
of 276,453 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#90
of 177 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,799,478 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,796 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,453 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 177 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.