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Dissecting Driver Behaviors Under Cognitive, Emotional, Sensorimotor, and Mixed Stressors

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
50 news outlets
blogs
10 blogs
twitter
19 X users
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
3 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
43 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
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Title
Dissecting Driver Behaviors Under Cognitive, Emotional, Sensorimotor, and Mixed Stressors
Published in
Scientific Reports, May 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep25651
Pubmed ID
Authors

I. Pavlidis, M. Dcosta, S. Taamneh, M. Manser, T. Ferris, R. Wunderlich, E. Akleman, P. Tsiamyrtzis

Abstract

In a simulation experiment we studied the effects of cognitive, emotional, sensorimotor, and mixed stressors on driver arousal and performance with respect to (wrt) baseline. In a sample of n = 59 drivers, balanced in terms of age and gender, we found that all stressors incurred significant increases in mean sympathetic arousal accompanied by significant increases in mean absolute steering. The latter, translated to significantly larger range of lane departures only in the case of sensorimotor and mixed stressors, indicating more dangerous driving wrt baseline. In the case of cognitive or emotional stressors, often a smaller range of lane departures was observed, indicating safer driving wrt baseline. This paradox suggests an effective coping mechanism at work, which compensates erroneous reactions precipitated by cognitive or emotional conflict. This mechanisms' grip slips, however, when the feedback loop is intermittently severed by sensorimotor distractions. Interestingly, mixed stressors did not affect crash rates in startling events, suggesting that the coping mechanism's compensation time scale is above the range of neurophysiological latency.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 1%
Unknown 72 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 22%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Master 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Unspecified 4 5%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 17 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 15 21%
Psychology 14 19%
Computer Science 9 12%
Unspecified 4 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 21 29%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 493. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2023.
All research outputs
#52,279
of 25,208,845 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#757
of 138,659 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,059
of 318,674 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#15
of 3,307 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,208,845 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 138,659 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 318,674 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,307 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.