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Quantum teleportation and entanglement distribution over 100-kilometre free-space channels

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, August 2012
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
blogs
10 blogs
twitter
78 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
24 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
pinterest
1 Pinner

Citations

dimensions_citation
263 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
297 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Quantum teleportation and entanglement distribution over 100-kilometre free-space channels
Published in
Nature, August 2012
DOI 10.1038/nature11332
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juan Yin, Ji-Gang Ren, He Lu, Yuan Cao, Hai-Lin Yong, Yu-Ping Wu, Chang Liu, Sheng-Kai Liao, Fei Zhou, Yan Jiang, Xin-Dong Cai, Ping Xu, Ge-Sheng Pan, Jian-Jun Jia, Yong-Mei Huang, Hao Yin, Jian-Yu Wang, Yu-Ao Chen, Cheng-Zhi Peng, Jian-Wei Pan

Abstract

Transferring an unknown quantum state over arbitrary distances is essential for large-scale quantum communication and distributed quantum networks. It can be achieved with the help of long-distance quantum teleportation and entanglement distribution. The latter is also important for fundamental tests of the laws of quantum mechanics. Although quantum teleportation and entanglement distribution over moderate distances have been realized using optical fibre links, the huge photon loss and decoherence in fibres necessitate the use of quantum repeaters for larger distances. However, the practical realization of quantum repeaters remains experimentally challenging. Free-space channels, first used for quantum key distribution, offer a more promising approach because photon loss and decoherence are almost negligible in the atmosphere. Furthermore, by using satellites, ultra-long-distance quantum communication and tests of quantum foundations could be achieved on a global scale. Previous experiments have achieved free-space distribution of entangled photon pairs over distances of 600 metres (ref. 14) and 13 kilometres (ref. 15), and transfer of triggered single photons over a 144-kilometre one-link free-space channel. Most recently, following a modified scheme, free-space quantum teleportation over 16 kilometres was demonstrated with a single pair of entangled photons. Here we report quantum teleportation of independent qubits over a 97-kilometre one-link free-space channel with multi-photon entanglement. An average fidelity of 80.4 ± 0.9 per cent is achieved for six distinct states. Furthermore, we demonstrate entanglement distribution over a two-link channel, in which the entangled photons are separated by 101.8 kilometres. Violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality is observed without the locality loophole. Besides being of fundamental interest, our results represent an important step towards a global quantum network. Moreover, the high-frequency and high-accuracy acquiring, pointing and tracking technique developed in our experiment can be directly used for future satellite-based quantum communication and large-scale tests of quantum foundations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 78 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 297 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 4 1%
Germany 3 1%
United States 3 1%
Australia 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Other 3 1%
Unknown 278 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 88 30%
Researcher 52 18%
Student > Master 38 13%
Student > Bachelor 26 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 19 6%
Other 45 15%
Unknown 29 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 184 62%
Engineering 29 10%
Computer Science 16 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 4%
Chemistry 5 2%
Other 20 7%
Unknown 32 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 252. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 December 2020.
All research outputs
#78,596
of 17,646,151 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#6,958
of 80,120 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#340
of 133,837 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#46
of 909 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,646,151 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 80,120 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 90.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 133,837 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 909 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.