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Strain specificities in influence of ageing on germinal centre reaction to inactivated influenza virus antigens in mice: Sex-based differences

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental Gerontology, May 2020
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Title
Strain specificities in influence of ageing on germinal centre reaction to inactivated influenza virus antigens in mice: Sex-based differences
Published in
Experimental Gerontology, May 2020
DOI 10.1016/j.exger.2020.110857
Pubmed ID
Authors

Biljana Bufan, Nevena Arsenović-Ranin, Raisa Petrović, Irena Živković, Vera Stoiljković, Gordana Leposavić

Abstract

Considering variability in vaccine responsiveness across human populations, in respect to magnitude and quality, and importance of vaccines in the elderly, the influence of recipient genetic background on the kinetics of age-related changes in the serum IgG antibody responses to seasonal trivalent inactivated split-virus influenza bulk (TIV) was studied in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice showing quantitative and qualitative differences in this responses in young adult ages. With ageing the total serum IgG response to influenza viruses declined, in a strain-specific manner, so the strain disparity observed in young adult mice (the greater magnitude of IgG response in BALB/c mice) disappeared in aged mice. However, the sexual dimorphisms in this response (more prominent in females of both strains) remained in aged ones. The strain-specific differences in age-related decline in the magnitude of IgG response to TIV correlated with the number of germinal centre (GC) B splenocytes. The age-related decline in GC B cell number was consistent with the decrease in the proliferation of B cells and CD4+ cells in splenocyte cultures upon restimulation with TIV. Additionally, the age-related decrease in the magnitude of IgG response correlated with the increase in follicular T regulatory (fTreg)/follicular T helper (fTh) and fTreg/GC B splenocyte ratios (reflecting decrease in fTh and GC B numbers without changes in fTreg number), and the frequency of CD4+ splenocytes producing IL-21, a key factor in balancing the B cell and fTreg cell activity. With ageing the avidity of virus influenza-specific antibody increased in females of both strains. Moreover, ageing affected IgG2a/IgG1 and IgG2c/IgG1 ratios (reflecting Th1/Th2 balance) in male BALB/c mice and female C57BL/6 mice, respectively. Consequently, differently from young mice exhibiting the similar ratios in male and female mice, in aged female mice of both strains IgG2a(c)/IgG1 ratios were shifted towards a less effective IgG1 response (stimulated by IL-4 cytokines) compared with males. The age-related alterations in IgG subclass profiles in both strains correlated with those in IFN-γ/IL-4 production level ratio in splenocyte cultures restimulated with TIV. These findings stimulate further research to formulate sex-specific strategies to improve efficacy of influenza vaccine in the elderly.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 45%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Student > Master 2 18%
Unknown 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 18%
Mathematics 1 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 9%
Sports and Recreations 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Unknown 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2020.
All research outputs
#13,302,688
of 16,737,500 outputs
Outputs from Experimental Gerontology
#1,695
of 2,050 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#236,193
of 328,342 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental Gerontology
#30
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,737,500 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,050 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 328,342 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.