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Murray Valley encephalitis: a review of clinical features, diagnosis and treatment

Overview of attention for article published in Medical Journal of Australia, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
64 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
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Title
Murray Valley encephalitis: a review of clinical features, diagnosis and treatment
Published in
Medical Journal of Australia, January 2012
DOI 10.5694/mja11.11026
Pubmed ID
Authors

James Knox, Raquel U Cowan, Joseph S Doyle, Matthew K Ligtermoet, John S Archer, James N C Burrow, Steven Y C Tong, Bart J Currie, John S Mackenzie, David W Smith, Mike Catton, Rodney J Moran, Craig A Aboltins, Jack S Richards

Abstract

Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV) is a mosquito-borne virus that is found across Australia, Papua New Guinea and Irian Jaya. MVEV is endemic to northern Australia and causes occasional outbreaks across south-eastern Australia. 2011 saw a dramatic increase in MVEV activity in endemic regions and the re-emergence of MVEV in south-eastern Australia. This followed significant regional flooding and increased numbers of the main mosquito vector, Culex annulirostris, and was evident from the widespread seroconversion of sentinel chickens, fatalities among horses and several cases in humans, resulting in at least three deaths. The last major outbreak in Australia was in 1974, during which 58 cases were identified and the mortality rate was about 20%. With the potential for a further outbreak of MVEV in the 2011-2012 summer and following autumn, we highlight the importance of this disease, its clinical characteristics and radiological and laboratory features. We present a suspected but unproven case of MVEV infection to illustrate some of the challenges in clinical management. It remains difficult to establish an early diagnosis of MVEV infection, and there is a lack of proven therapeutic options.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 17%
Student > Bachelor 9 15%
Researcher 6 10%
Other 5 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 7%
Other 12 20%
Unknown 13 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 12 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 68. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2020.
All research outputs
#430,594
of 19,710,574 outputs
Outputs from Medical Journal of Australia
#231
of 5,432 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,846
of 275,721 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Medical Journal of Australia
#8
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,710,574 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,432 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,721 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.