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The Do-Well study: protocol for a randomised controlled trial, economic and qualitative process evaluations of domiciliary welfare rights advice for socio-economically disadvantaged older people…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
110 Mendeley
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Title
The Do-Well study: protocol for a randomised controlled trial, economic and qualitative process evaluations of domiciliary welfare rights advice for socio-economically disadvantaged older people recruited via primary health care
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-12-382
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catherine Haighton, Suzanne Moffatt, Denise Howel, Elaine McColl, Eugene Milne, Mark Deverill, Greg Rubin, Terry Aspray, Martin White

Abstract

Older people in poor health are more likely to need extra money, aids and adaptations to allow them to remain independent and cope with ill health, yet in the UK many do not claim the welfare benefits to which they are entitled. Welfare rights advice interventions lead to greater welfare income, but have not been rigorously evaluated for health benefits. This study will evaluate the effects on health and well-being of a domiciliary welfare rights advice service provided by local government or voluntary organisations in North East England for independent living, socio-economically disadvantaged older people (aged ≥60 yrs), recruited from general (primary care) practices.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 6 5%
Spain 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Haiti 1 <1%
Unknown 101 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 17%
Researcher 17 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Student > Bachelor 6 5%
Other 27 25%
Unknown 11 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 23%
Social Sciences 20 18%
Psychology 11 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 2%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 11 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2019.
All research outputs
#1,124,265
of 15,147,785 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,260
of 10,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,687
of 126,547 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,147,785 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,468 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 126,547 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.