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Detection of identity by descent using next-generation whole genome sequencing data

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Bioinformatics, June 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
86 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
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Title
Detection of identity by descent using next-generation whole genome sequencing data
Published in
BMC Bioinformatics, June 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2105-13-121
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shu-Yi Su, Jay Kasberger, Sergio Baranzini, William Byerley, Wilson Liao, Jorge Oksenberg, Elliott Sherr, Eric Jorgenson

Abstract

Identity by descent (IBD) has played a fundamental role in the discovery of genetic loci underlying human diseases. Both pedigree-based and population-based linkage analyses rely on estimating recent IBD, and evidence of ancient IBD can be used to detect population structure in genetic association studies. Various methods for detecting IBD, including those implemented in the soft- ware programs fastIBD and GERMLINE, have been developed in the past several years using population genotype data from microarray platforms. Now, next-generation DNA sequencing data is becoming increasingly available, enabling the comprehensive analysis of genomes, in- cluding identifying rare variants. These sequencing data may provide an opportunity to detect IBD with higher resolution than previously possible, potentially enabling the detection of disease causing loci that were previously undetectable with sparser genetic data.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Germany 2 2%
Netherlands 2 2%
Sweden 2 2%
Korea, Republic of 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Unknown 73 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 32 37%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 29%
Student > Master 9 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 5%
Other 9 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 64%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 8%
Mathematics 3 3%
Psychology 2 2%
Other 6 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2014.
All research outputs
#2,872,442
of 12,373,386 outputs
Outputs from BMC Bioinformatics
#1,215
of 4,576 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,492
of 119,926 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Bioinformatics
#10
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,386 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,576 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 119,926 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.