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Metabolic diseases and pro- and prebiotics: Mechanistic insights

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
61 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
157 Mendeley
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Title
Metabolic diseases and pro- and prebiotics: Mechanistic insights
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1743-7075-9-60
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yukiko K Nakamura, Stanley T Omaye

Abstract

Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, are world-wide health problems. The prevalence of metabolic diseases is associated with dynamic changes in dietary macronutrient intake during the past decades. Based on national statistics and from a public health viewpoint, traditional approaches, such as diet and physical activity, have been unsuccessful in decreasing the prevalence of metabolic diseases. Since the approaches strongly rely on individual's behavior and motivation, novel science-based strategies should be considered for prevention and therapy for the diseases. Metabolism and immune system are linked. Both overnutrition and infection result in inflammation through nutrient and pathogen sensing systems which recognize compounds with structural similarities. Dietary macronutrients (fats and sugars) can induce inflammation through activation of an innate immune receptor, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Long-term intake of diets high in fats and meats appear to induce chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, endotoxicity, and metabolic diseases. Recent investigations support the idea of the involvement of intestinal bacteria in host metabolism and preventative and therapeutic potentials of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for metabolic diseases. Specific intestinal bacteria seem to serve as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sources through LPS and/or bacterial translocation into the circulation due to a vulnerable microbial barrier and increased intestinal permeability and to play a role in systemic inflammation and progression of metabolic diseases. This review focuses on mechanistic links between metabolic diseases (mainly obesity and type 2 diabetes), chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, intestinal environment, and nutrition and prospective views of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for the diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 157 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
India 2 1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 146 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 41 26%
Researcher 29 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 16%
Student > Bachelor 15 10%
Other 11 7%
Other 28 18%
Unknown 8 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 62 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 36 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 3%
Other 20 13%
Unknown 15 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2016.
All research outputs
#2,629,937
of 12,011,028 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#267
of 614 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,406
of 111,135 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#4
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,011,028 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 614 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 111,135 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.