↓ Skip to main content

Regular long-term red blood cell transfusions for managing chronic chest complications in sickle cell disease

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, May 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
109 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Regular long-term red blood cell transfusions for managing chronic chest complications in sickle cell disease
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, May 2016
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd008360.pub4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lise J Estcourt, Patricia M Fortin, Sally Hopewell, Marialena Trivella, Ian R Hambleton, Gavin Cho

Abstract

Sickle cell disease is a genetic haemoglobin disorder, which can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Sickle cell disease is one of the most common severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. The two most common chronic chest complications due to sickle cell disease are pulmonary hypertension and chronic sickle lung disease. These complications can lead to morbidity (such as reduced exercise tolerance) and increased mortality.This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2011 and updated in 2014. We wanted to determine whether trials involving people with sickle cell disease that compare regular long-term blood transfusion regimens with standard care, hydroxycarbamide (hydroxyurea) any other drug treatment show differences in the following: mortality associated with chronic chest complications; severity of established chronic chest complications; development and progression of chronic chest complications; serious adverse events. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register. Date of the last search: 25 April 2016.We also searched for randomised controlled trials in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 26 January 2016), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1950), and ongoing trial databases to 26 January 2016. We included randomised controlled trials of people of any age with one of four common sickle cell disease genotypes, i.e. Hb SS, Sß(0), SC, or Sß(+) that compared regular red blood cell transfusion regimens (either simple or exchange transfusions) to hydroxycarbamide, any other drug treatment, or to standard care that were aimed at reducing the development or progression of chronic chest complications (chronic sickle lung and pulmonary hypertension). We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. No studies matching the selection criteria were found. There is a need for randomised controlled trials looking at the role of long-term transfusion therapy in pulmonary hypertension and chronic sickle lung disease. Due to the chronic nature of the conditions, such trials should aim to use a combination of objective and subjective measures to assess participants repeatedly before and after the intervention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Brazil 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 101 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 25%
Student > Postgraduate 14 13%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Unspecified 10 9%
Other 9 8%
Other 37 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 54 50%
Unspecified 16 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 9%
Social Sciences 7 6%
Psychology 5 5%
Other 17 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 January 2019.
All research outputs
#3,651,767
of 13,194,193 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#6,611
of 10,520 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,494
of 265,311 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#127
of 187 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,194,193 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,520 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.6. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,311 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 187 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.