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Global proliferation of cephalopods

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, May 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

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Title
Global proliferation of cephalopods
Published in
Current Biology, May 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2016.04.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zoë A. Doubleday, Thomas A.A. Prowse, Alexander Arkhipkin, Graham J. Pierce, Jayson Semmens, Michael Steer, Stephen C. Leporati, Sílvia Lourenço, Antoni Quetglas, Warwick Sauer, Bronwyn M. Gillanders

Abstract

Human activities have substantially changed the world's oceans in recent decades, altering marine food webs, habitats and biogeochemical processes [1]. Cephalopods (squid, cuttlefish and octopuses) have a unique set of biological traits, including rapid growth, short lifespans and strong life-history plasticity, allowing them to adapt quickly to changing environmental conditions [2-4]. There has been growing speculation that cephalopod populations are proliferating in response to a changing environment, a perception fuelled by increasing trends in cephalopod fisheries catch [4,5]. To investigate long-term trends in cephalopod abundance, we assembled global time-series of cephalopod catch rates (catch per unit of fishing or sampling effort). We show that cephalopod populations have increased over the last six decades, a result that was remarkably consistent across a highly diverse set of cephalopod taxa. Positive trends were also evident for both fisheries-dependent and fisheries-independent time-series, suggesting that trends are not solely due to factors associated with developing fisheries. Our results suggest that large-scale, directional processes, common to a range of coastal and oceanic environments, are responsible. This study presents the first evidence that cephalopod populations have increased globally, indicating that these ecologically and commercially important invertebrates may have benefited from a changing ocean environment.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 229 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 336 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Belgium 2 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 324 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 62 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 54 16%
Student > Master 45 13%
Student > Bachelor 44 13%
Other 16 5%
Other 45 13%
Unknown 70 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 131 39%
Environmental Science 68 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 16 5%
Computer Science 3 <1%
Other 11 3%
Unknown 89 26%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1361. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 August 2023.
All research outputs
#9,695
of 25,992,468 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#102
of 14,906 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106
of 313,205 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#2
of 200 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,992,468 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,906 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 62.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 313,205 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 200 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.