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A qualitative study of older people’s experience of living with neurogenic claudication to inform the development of a physiotherapy intervention

Overview of attention for article published in Disability & Rehabilitation, May 2016
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

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65 Mendeley
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Title
A qualitative study of older people’s experience of living with neurogenic claudication to inform the development of a physiotherapy intervention
Published in
Disability & Rehabilitation, May 2016
DOI 10.1080/09638288.2016.1177611
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samantha Lyle, Esther Williamson, Frances Darton, Frances Griffiths, Sarah E. Lamb

Abstract

The aim of this study was to explore older people's experiences of living with neurogenic claudication (NC), their preferences for physiotherapy treatment provision and associated outcomes in order to inform an intervention to be tested in a clinical trial. Patients with a diagnosis of NC and/or lumbar spinal stenosis were recruited through a UK NHS tertiary care center. Semi-structured interviews and self-report questionnaires were used to obtain data. A thematic analysis was conducted. 15 participants were recruited; half were classed as frail older adults. Pain and the threat of pain was a prominent feature of participants' experience of NC. This led to a loss of engagement in meaningful activities and sense of self. Discourses of ageing influenced experiences as well as treatment preferences, particularly the acceptability of walking aids. A combination of one-to-one and group setting for treatment was preferred. Outcome preferences related to re-engagement in meaningful activities and pain reduction. Limitations relate to generalisability of the findings for NC patients not under physiotherapy treatment. We have obtained important findings about older people's experiences of living with NC and preferences for physiotherapy treatment and outcomes. These will be incorporated into an evidence-based intervention and evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. Implications for rehabilitation Older people living with NC want to get back to meaningful activities and learn how to live with the threat of pain. Allied health professionals (AHPs) should be sensitive to the complex and ambiguous ways in which older people live with ageing and age-related decline. AHPs are in a position to support patients' successful transition to the use of walking aids thereby reducing stigmatizing effects and increasing activity. AHPs should consider a mixture of one-to-one and group classes to enable rehabilitation for older NC patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 64 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Researcher 5 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 21 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 14 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 20%
Social Sciences 6 9%
Psychology 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 21 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 March 2018.
All research outputs
#11,957,656
of 15,675,400 outputs
Outputs from Disability & Rehabilitation
#2,150
of 2,644 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,440
of 268,574 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Disability & Rehabilitation
#38
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,675,400 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,644 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,574 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.