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Bidirectional association between physical activity and muscular strength in older adults: Results from the UK Biobank study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Epidemiology, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
14 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
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Title
Bidirectional association between physical activity and muscular strength in older adults: Results from the UK Biobank study
Published in
International Journal of Epidemiology, May 2016
DOI 10.1093/ije/dyw054
Pubmed ID
Authors

A.J.M. Cooper, M.J.E. Lamb, S.J. Sharp, R.K. Simmons, S.J. Griffin

Abstract

The relationship between physical activity and muscular strength has not been examined in detail among older adults. The objective of this study was to examine the associations between physical activity and hand grip strength among adults aged ≥ 60 years. Using data from the UK Biobank study, we included 66 582 men and women with complete baseline data and 6599 with 4.5 years of follow-up data. We used multiple linear regression models to examine the cross-sectional, longitudinal and bidirectional associations between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and grip strength, adjusting for potential confounding by age, sex, height, weight, health status, education level, smoking status, Townsend deprivation index and retirement status. In cross-sectional analyses, grip strength and MVPA were linearly and positively associated with each other. Longitudinally, baseline MVPA was not associated with grip strength at follow-up {difference between quintile [Q] 5 and Q1 = 0.40 [95% confidence interval (CI): -0.14, 0.94]kg}, whereas baseline grip strength was associated with MVPA at follow-up [Q5 vs Q1 = 7.15 (1.18, 13.12) min/day]. People who maintained/increased time spent in MVPA did not experience any benefit in grip strength [0.08 (-0.20, 0.37) kg] whereas those who increased their grip strength spent 3.69 (0.20, 7.17) min/day extra in MVPA. Promotion of strength-training activities may enable and maintain participation in regular physical activity among older adults.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Unknown 81 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 23%
Student > Master 13 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 16 19%
Unknown 11 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 31%
Sports and Recreations 11 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Psychology 3 4%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 20 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2020.
All research outputs
#2,865,821
of 15,660,877 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Epidemiology
#1,516
of 4,718 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,552
of 268,679 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Epidemiology
#46
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,660,877 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,718 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,679 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.