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Nature and function of insulator protein binding sites in the Drosophila genome

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Research, July 2012
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Title
Nature and function of insulator protein binding sites in the Drosophila genome
Published in
Genome Research, July 2012
DOI 10.1101/gr.138156.112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Y. B. Schwartz, D. Linder-Basso, P. V. Kharchenko, M. Y. Tolstorukov, M. Kim, H.-B. Li, A. A. Gorchakov, A. Minoda, G. Shanower, A. A. Alekseyenko, N. C. Riddle, Y. L. Jung, T. Gu, A. Plachetka, S. C. R. Elgin, M. I. Kuroda, P. J. Park, M. Savitsky, G. H. Karpen, V. Pirrotta

Abstract

Chromatin insulator elements and associated proteins have been proposed to partition eukaryotic genomes into sets of independently regulated domains. Here we test this hypothesis by quantitative genome-wide analysis of insulator protein binding to Drosophila chromatin. We find distinct combinatorial binding of insulator proteins to different classes of sites and uncover a novel type of insulator element that binds CP190 but not any other known insulator proteins. Functional characterization of different classes of binding sites indicates that only a small fraction act as robust insulators in standard enhancer-blocking assays. We show that insulators restrict the spreading of the H3K27me3 mark but only at a small number of Polycomb target regions and only to prevent repressive histone methylation within adjacent genes that are already transcriptionally inactive. RNAi knockdown of insulator proteins in cultured cells does not lead to major alterations in genome expression. Taken together, these observations argue against the concept of a genome partitioned by specialized boundary elements and suggest that insulators are reserved for specific regulation of selected genes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 147 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 4%
Germany 3 2%
Russia 2 1%
France 2 1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 131 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 53 36%
Researcher 37 25%
Student > Master 17 12%
Student > Bachelor 11 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 9 6%
Other 12 8%
Unknown 8 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 86 59%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 46 31%
Computer Science 5 3%
Arts and Humanities 1 <1%
Physics and Astronomy 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2012.
All research outputs
#10,969,927
of 12,367,469 outputs
Outputs from Genome Research
#3,321
of 3,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,691
of 120,534 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Research
#55
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,367,469 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,372 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.