↓ Skip to main content

Air pollution, weather, and respiratory emergency room visits in two northern New England cities: an ecological time-series study

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Research, March 2005
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
68 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Air pollution, weather, and respiratory emergency room visits in two northern New England cities: an ecological time-series study
Published in
Environmental Research, March 2005
DOI 10.1016/j.envres.2004.07.010
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adam M. Wilson, Cameron P. Wake, Tom Kelly, Jeffrey C. Salloway

Abstract

Daily emergency room (ER) visits for all respiratory (ICD-9 460-519) and asthma (ICD-9 493) were compared with daily sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), and weather variables over the period 1998-2000 in Portland, Maine (population 248,000), and 1996-2000 in Manchester, New Hampshire (population 176,000). Seasonal variability was removed from all variables using nonparametric smoothed function (LOESS) of day of study. Generalized additive models were used to estimate the effect of elevated levels of pollutants on ER visits. Relative risks of pollutants are reported over their interquartile range (IQR, the 75th -25th percentile pollutant values). In Portland, an IQR increase in SO2 was associated with a 5% (95% CI 2-7%) increase in all respiratory ER visits and a 6% (95% CI 1-12%) increase in asthma visits. An IQR increase in O3 was associated with a 5% (95% CI 1-10%) increase in Portland asthmatic ER visits. No significant associations were found in Manchester, New Hampshire, possibly due to statistical limitations of analyzing a smaller population. The absence of statistical evidence for a relationship should not be used as evidence of no relationship. This analysis reveals that, on a daily basis, elevated SO2 and O3 have a significant impact on public health in Portland, Maine.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Ireland 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 44 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 21%
Other 4 8%
Student > Master 3 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Other 15 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 12 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 10%
Unspecified 4 8%
Mathematics 3 6%
Other 14 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2018.
All research outputs
#2,047,344
of 12,212,281 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Research
#630
of 3,097 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,439
of 116,014 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Research
#11
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,212,281 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,097 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 116,014 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.